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Tag Archives: Trelleborg Marine Systems

TALKING TERMINAL AUTOMATION: WE’RE BACK AT THE PTI CONFERENCE

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

We’re gearing up for a big year this year. We’ve talked a lot about how the industry is changing – and must continue to change – to effectively embrace smart technologies.

We’re keen to talk to like-minded industry stakeholders and find out what their plans are too.

The Port and Terminal Automation and Training Conference is the perfect place. Last year’s conference was a huge success and a really interesting platform for debate, and I’m very much looking forward to participating in this year’s two day event.

The marine industry is at a crucial point in its journey towards a new, more efficient and automated future. We want Trelleborg to be at the heart of it. We’re looking forward to discussing the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead with some of the biggest names in port and terminal automation and training.

To find out more about the conference, visit: http://ow.ly/g2j6308nhBs – and watch this space for more news from Trelleborg on how we’re embracing smart technologies and evolving accordingly.

 

 

MARIMATECH BECOMES TRELLEBORG MARINE SYSTEMS DENMARK

As you may know, towards the end of last year, Trelleborg acquired Marimatech, and we have recently taken a key step towards becoming one company, with Marimatech A/S officially transferring its legal entity to become Trelleborg Marine Systems Denmark, with immediate effect.

We’re committed to taking a smarter approach within our product lines. Marimatech’s navigation and ship positioning portfolio really supports this objective, so we’re pleased that the acquisition has progressed so quickly.

We’re already looking for ways in which Marimatech’s legacy technology can be integrated with our existing product range and look forward to sharing innovations with the market in the months and years to come.

For more information, please visit our website and have a look at the press release announcing the acquisition: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/marine-systems

2015 TWENTY20 CRICKET CHALLENGE

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation recently held the latest in its series of Cricket Challenges in Ahmedabad, India.

Starting in 2010, these cricket games have featured teams from the local marine systems Engineering Centre, based in Ahmedabad, versus a multi-national team from the marine systems BU management team.

As usual, this year’s game was a closely fought contest (well not that close really!!), with the local Indian team narrowly coming out as winners. (Actually the Management team were thrashed! Again!)

As in previous years, the friendship and camaraderie between the two teams was fantastic to see. We’re already looking forward to the next game. But perhaps it will be football next time.

The cricket game coincided with a management meeting held at the marine systems Engineering Centre, located in the centre of Ahmedabad. This centre now employs close to 40 skilled, graduate engineers, who support the global marine systems business, covering mechanical, structural and electrical engineering disciplines. It is also starting to provide engineering support to other Trelleborg businesses.

TRELLEBORG REPORT HIGHLIGHTS POTENTIAL OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Our latest Barometer Report, which discusses the issues impacting ports and terminals around the globe, revealed that over 40% of the port owners and operators surveyed have experienced an increase in throughput in the last twelve months.

To accommodate the higher levels of throughput, demanded by larger ships carrying more cargo, ports should look increasingly towards automated or ‘smart’ technologies.

Automated technology has a significant role to play in delivering greater operational efficiency, reducing unit costs by helping to process cargo more quickly and more consistently. This principle and drive for efficient turnaround should extend to the jetty side too. There is a vast opportunity to reduce human error and refine scheduling as vessels come in to port, berth and are dispatched.

While the wider transport and logistics sector is relatively advanced in its grasp and use of ‘smart’ technology, the ‘Internet of Things’ mentality is not necessarily translating quickly within ports and terminals. The more rapidly we take a smarter approach to connecting equipment, the quicker we can collect and analyze data from it – and the sooner we’ll improve efficiency.

With that in mind, it’s positive that 74% of those surveyed are open to new technologies, showing a willingness to adapt and improve. The industry is beginning to look forward and embrace new trends, which is reflected by the fact that so many are now using one or more forms of automated technology.

Only 7% say they don’t use any automated systems – instead, relying on human or manual guidance at their facilities. This is much less than last year, when 19% said the same, while in 2013 we observed that the market was lagging behind the technology available to it.

While the use of automated technologies continues to grow, so too does our commitment to taking a smarter approach to port and terminal efficiency, and extending the automation that is becoming increasingly well-established on the land side, to the jetty side too. This commitment was highlighted by our recent acquisition of Marimatech, whose navigation and ship positioning product line utilize the latest ‘smart’ technology. These are to be integrated with our existing product range and will further strengthen our offering as a turnkey supplier of systems for both ship and terminal owners.

To download the Barometer Report 5, visit: http://ow.ly/VmYR3

TRELLEBORG TO SPONSOR PIANC YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING EVENT

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine operation

Given the growing importance of nurturing young talent within the industry and our unwavering commitment to best practice as a PIANC Platinum Partner, we are delighted to be named as the official sponsor of PIANC’s latest Young Professionals-Com (YP) networking event, to be held on 27 November at The Penny Black in Singapore.

YP-Com is dedicated to the career development of PIANC members 40 years of age and younger; locally, nationally and globally. The event, which will also be attended by various industry leaders, is designed to encourage global participation within PIANC, and facilitate networking amongst young and senior professionals.

At the event, Regional Sales Manager of Trelleborg’s marine operation, William Tan, will take to the stage to discuss a range of key industry issues as well as Trelleborg’s longstanding association with PIANC.

For more information about the event, or if you’d like to register your attendance, contact Zigian Yang: ziqian.yang@dmc.nl

 

 

TRELLEBORG ENGINEER JOINS PRESTIGIOUS GASTECH YOUNG ENGINEER FOUNDATION

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

We call ourselves the Performance People because we ensure the right support is in place for our customers from conceptual design to after sales care. To enable us to deliver truly end-to-end service to our customers, we’re committed to the professional development of our staff.

With that in mind, I am delighted to reveal that Matthew Walker, Project Engineer at our operation in Australia has been handpicked to join the esteemed Gastech Young Engineer Foundation (GYEF).

Given the growing need to attract young talent to the energy industry, the GYEF recognizes and supports the next generation of engineers. The GYEF’s committee, which represents several leading figures in the global energy industry, selected Matthew as one of just 80 successful candidates from several hundred applicants.

Bolstering the professional development of engineers in the early stages of their career, the GYEF has awarded Matthew access to an exclusive package of educational and networking opportunities. This includes a complementary delegate pass for the 2015 Gastech Conference & Exhibition in Singapore (27th – 30th October 2015), providing the opportunity to connect and network with peers and industry leaders. In addition, Matthew has also been awarded a lifetime membership to Gastech’s Young Engineer Alumni and granted unlimited access to online mentoring from thought leaders through a dedicated section of the GYEF website.

For Matthew to be recognized so enthusiastically at such an early stage in his career is a phenomenal feat. We hold a long-standing commitment to the professional development of our staff, and this is testament to our ability to produce industry ready talent.

To find out more about The Gastech Young Engineer Foundation, visit: http://www.youngengineersfoundation.com/

THE IMPORTANCE OF MIXING, MANUFACTURING AND MODULUS

We’re pleased to announce that, last week, we launched a brand new whitepaper and webinar which aim to raise awareness of the importance of ingredient selection, mixing and the manufacturing process in marine fenders.

Building on our previous research into ingredient selection and its impact on fender performance, the new materials highlight that compound modulus – the relationship between stress and strain in a cured rubber sample – is a far more effective and robust measure of fender performance than the traditional ‘hardness’, which is currently used in the industry.

The new research has proven beyond doubt the need for a new measure of fender performance, as ‘hardness’ is unreliable and can be easily falsified. As such, we suggest that the industry moves towards measuring the modulus of rubber compounds, to ensure the characteristics of the fender are truly understood.

Compound modulus is the determining factor of a fender’s performance, and highly impacted by the dispersion of filler in the rubber.  This dispersion, in turn, is dependent on the mixing process, the quality of which is determined by the machinery used.

We have discovered that even a superior rubber formulation – one which uses natural rubber and reinforcing fillers – can be degraded if it is subjected to an inferior mixing process, ultimately producing a low performance compound and a low performance fender.

The uniformity of filler dispersion within the rubber is critical: poor dispersion can lead to damaging effects such as reduced service life, poor performance, poor appearance and even poor product uniformity.

Our new whitepaper discusses the importance of the machinery used to mix the ingredients: there are a number of related parameters that affect filler dispersion in the final mix, including ram pressure, rotor speed and design, coolant temperature and sequence.

The new whitepaper explores which machinery options are most effective and give manufacturers the most control over these critical factors.

The webinar goes into more detail on the importance of measuring modulus, including an examination of filler dispersion in compounds produced by different mixing machines.

We’d love you to read the whitepaper, and watch the webinar – and let us know what you think of the new research in the comments.

To download the whitepaper, “Rubber Fenders: Mixing it Up”, please click here.

To watch the webinar, “Assuring fender Performance”, please click here.

EXAMINING THE IMPACT OF MEGA SHIPS

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)’s International Transport Forum recently released ‘The Impact of Mega Ships’, a new report investigating the impact of larger container ships on infrastructure, equipment and port traffic.

The report, which looks at the pros and cons of the current ‘mega’ container ships, put forward that 24,000 TEU vessels, which could be in service as soon as 2020, will have a major impact on main trade lines, potentially raising transport costs and hindering the competitiveness of ports overall.

We submitted information to the report with regards to the impact that ever increasing vessel sizes are having on port infrastructure, and in particular fenders and docking and mooring equipment such as bollards and hooks.

It’s a timely report. Our latest Barometer Report survey, the fifth that we have conducted, has found that ports are still struggling to keep up with the demands of increasing vessel sizes, especially in terms of onwards logistics.

This is another problem highlighted by the OECD report: although increasing vessel sizes have delivered cost savings in the past, these are decreasing with size, and size-related ‘fixes’ to port and hinterland infrastructure could be substantial.

A more complex challenge

Whilst mega ships bring these increased demands with them, one of the biggest challenges we see is actually designing berths to accommodate the large vessels of the future, whilst ensuring that they are still able to accommodate smaller vessels in the short term.

For our part, this requires fender design that can accommodate a wide range of operating parameters.  Designing a fender system that will perform successfully with kinds of vessel means the rubber compound must be fine-tuned to absorb the required energy, no matter the size of the ship. The properties of the rubber element must be hard enough to withstand the high loads from larger vessels, yet soft enough to accept the loads from smaller vessels.

Bigger ships doesn’t necessarily equal bigger fenders

The new generation of large container vessels uses several fenders at once, which limits the need for increased fender sizes; the extra amount of energy that needs to be absorbed is simply absorbed via more fenders. However, designing for multiple fender contact is still not straightforward for new mega vessels. The considerable bow flare of these ships, designed to accommodate as many containers as possible, mean that even a small berthing angle can lead to contact between the ship and the quay wall equipment.

Taking the pressure off

The rubber component of the fender system can be developed in other ways too, and can even reduce the impact on other port equipment in accommodating mega ships. For example, by designing fender systems with a smaller profile – but more efficient performance characteristics – ports can avoid the often costly process of extending or replacing cranes.

As we see it, ever growing vessel sizes certainly bring with them a whole host of new considerations for ports, not least upgrading infrastructure to allow them to berth. With onwards logistics considerations bringing about their own problems, there needs to be more collaboration and communication across the whole supply chain.

Working with and across suppliers, through an iterative process, from design, is critical to ensuring the port itself benefits from the increased throughput of increased vessel sizes, rather than being hamstrung by it.

TRELLEBORG HOSTS PORT INFRASTRUCTURE AND INNOVATION SEMINAR

Here at Trelleborg, It’s important to us to have a constant dialogue with port owners, operators and consultants, to ensure that we’re always listening to the market and can pre-empt and meet new demands as they arise.

As such, we decided to host an exclusive, free to attend seminar featuring the themes of port infrastructure and innovation. The seminar was held on March 26th at the Grand Connaught Rooms, London, England.

The seminar provided valuable insight on design and selection best practice with the objective of improving efficiencies and optimizing performance. As well as the presentations given on the day, it was a great opportunity for us to get feedback from the attendees and find out more about the challenges that the market is facing to continue to inform our product development.

Our experts discussed topics from best practise in docking and mooring to rubber quality, buoyancy products, marine products, navigation aids and CE marking. The seminar also saw guest speaker, Peter Beamish, chairman of the BS6349-4 committee on fenders and moorings, take to the stage to discuss the scope and changes in the new code of general practices, and how these changes can affect mooring solutions on a global scale.

In all, I would like to say a huge thanks to all those that attended and for your extremely positive feedback. With that in mind, we thoroughly look forward to planning more in the future.

TRELLEBORG TO LAUNCH PORT INFRASTRUCTURE AND INNOVATION SEMINAR SERIES

Marco Gaal, Regional Director at Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Here at Trelleborg, we’re constantly looking for ways to develop our offering to meet new market needs. To do so, we try to ensure that we’re communicating with the market as much as possible to gain valuable insights and feedback on our offering. 

As such, we will be hosting two exclusive one-day seminars featuring the themes of port infrastructure and innovation. Held on 24th March at the Mercure Hotel, Den Haag Leidschendam in Holland, and on 26th March at the Grand Connaught Rooms in London, the free seminars will see myself and a number of colleagues, as well as a number of guest speakers from across the industry, discuss a range of key industry issues, including the optimization of whole-life performance in fender systems. The seminars will provide attendees with valuable insights into marine fender design and selection best practice, and the latest docking and mooring innovations to improve efficiency and improve performance.

The new series of seminars will allow us to talk in-depth with contractors and consultants so we can ensure we’re up to date with the latest market developments and can evolve our offering to meet them.

Ultimately, it’s vital that suppliers meet the needs of their clients by offering support in the areas that customers need it most, be that maintenance, training or other operational requirements across the entire product lifecycle. In our new series of seminars, we’re striving to ensure we do exactly that.

For more information about the conference, or if you’d like to register your attendance at either seminar, visit: http://trelleborg.tecs1.com/Consultant