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Tag Archives: terminal

SAFEPILOT GUIDES FOURTH LARGEST CRUISE SHIP INTO NAPIER PORT

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Our SafePilot system was used to safely navigate MS Ovation of the Seas, the equal fourth largest cruise ship in operation in the world, in to dock at Napier Port on Hawke’s Bay in New Zealand. Napier is the North Island’s second largest export port by tonnage. It hosts around 50 cruise ship visits each year, but the Ovation of the Seas is the largest it’s ever received, overtaking the 138,194 tonne MS Voyager of the Seas, which first visited in 2014.

Ovation of the Seas is a cruise ship operated by Royal Caribbean International (RCI). The third ship in the Quantum class, it is the second largest class of passenger ship behind RCI’s Oasis class ships. At 348m long, 18 decks high, weighing 168,666 tonnes, with capacity for 6,500 people, the vessel is the equal fourth-largest cruise ship in the world.

The Port is a long-term customer of Trelleborg, who has supplied the port for 15 years. The SafePilot CAT III unit is designed for robustness, accuracy and reliability. It is engineered to meet the needs of the most demanding piloting applications which require accuracy to the centimetre as well as heave, pitch and roll monitoring.

I’ll leave you with a few comments from Ruslan Mitlash, one of the two Napier Port pilots that used Trelleborg’s CAT III SafePilot solution to bring this large ship into the relatively small port, and Napier Port’s Port Services Manager Bruce Lochhead.

Ruslan said: “There was no room for error when berthing the Ovation of the Seas at Napier Port, so accurate information on speed, rate of turn (ROT), and clearing distances was vital. SafePilot was an integral part of the operation right from the planning stage, and the real-time information it provided was critical to the safety and success of the manoeuvre.

“We find SafePilot very user-friendly, and being able to use it with a tablet makes it a convenient tool not just for pilots, but for the whole team on the bridge.”

Bruce said: “It was a great experience seeing Ovation of the Seas come into port, as the weather conditions the night before had us thinking twice about whether she would be able to berth. We’re very proud that Ovation’s call went so smoothly – it was a real testament to the skill of our pilots, the calibre of their equipment, and the efforts of the team here at Napier Port.”

You can watch a time-lapse of the arrival here.

TRELLEBORG LAUNCHES AUTOMOOR FOR SMART, ROPE FREE MOORING

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Docking and mooring can play a critical role in increasing throughput of an individual berth and overall port facility. No matter the application, ports and terminals worldwide are under pressure to increase throughput. However, trying to do so at the same time as dealing with increasing vessel sizes can be difficult. Optimizing operational windows is an effective route to improving efficiency and one that AutoMoor enables by reducing the time taken to moor vessels.

AutoMoor is a rope-free, automated mooring system that uses smart technologies to enable a faster berthing process and improve safety levels within the port environment. Using vacuum technology to rapidly attach to and secure a vessel at berth, it reduces vessel motions, and continuously monitors all mooring loads acting on the vessel at berth, providing live data to the operator to optimize day-to-day port and terminal operations. It also minimizes personnel involvement to reduce human error and improve safety.

With mooring units that provide real time data to monitor vessel mooring loads, Trelleborg is offering the automated technology needed to compete effectively in today’s complex, global landscape.

Automated mooring technologies minimize downtime by reducing the effects passing ships have on moored vessels. When using mooring lines, operators may need to interrupt operations, costing time and money in delayed product transfer. Using an automated mooring system to dampen vessel motions and extend the range of conditions in which efficient transfer can take place can have huge implications for efficiency.

AutoMoor is also intended to help ports and terminals become more environmentally efficient, because vessels can be secured in under a minute and released in 30 seconds. This reduces vessel idling time and reduces the time tug boats are required alongside the vessel until the mooring operation is complete, cutting emissions overall.

Trelleborg’s AutoMoor solution falls under the operation’s SmartPort portfolio. SmartPort is Trelleborg’s answer to the need for a standardized way to collect and store data in marine applications. It’s a technology platform that connects port operations, allowing users to analyze asset performance and apply data insights, to improve day-to-day decision making.

The most important aspect of SmartPort is the open API structure which enables collaboration with third party systems and third party assets. Historically, Trelleborg has supplied many products for the port environment, from fenders to mooring equipment to ship performance monitoring to navigation and piloting systems: each of which can have their own sensors fitted. By adopting SmartPort architecture, all of these systems and more can be brought under one cloud based system.

To find out more about AutoMoor, download the brochure and discover the smarter approach to docking and mooring: http://ow.ly/ARF330fiAaa

 

TRELLEBORG DISCUSSES ENHANCING MARITIME SAFETY AT PIANC VIETNAM SEMINAR

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation discussed the role of port and terminal equipment optimization in enhancing maritime safety at a two-day PIANC (Vietnam) seminar, held 14 July at Hotel Continental Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Co-organized by Trelleborg, Surbana Jurong and KASI Malaysia, the seminar discussed the latest in planning and design, marine risk assessment and vessel traffic management technology. This saw Trelleborg Regional Sales Manager (Marine Fenders, Asia) William Tan discuss the role of advanced marine fender systems in port, terminal and vessel safety.

Trelleborg Sales Director (Docking and Mooring, China and SEA) Ron Lee presented a case study on the Spirit of Tasmania II to emphasize the need for ports to adopt automated mooring to making mooring operations safer. Ron also discussed how port safety can be further enhanced by taking a holistic overview of operations, and the importance of implementing a complete port solution incorporating predictive environmental monitoring and an integrated Port System. Following the seminar (15 July), visitors also received a tour of the Saigon International Terminal Vietnam along the Cai Mep Thi Vai River, which uses Trelleborg Super Cone Fenders, SCK Cell Fenders and bollards.

To be invited to speak at the seminar is a real compliment, and testament to our industry expertise and reputation as a world leader in the design and manufacture of advanced navigation, piloting and port systems, and use of state-of-the-art software and smart technology to help pilots and ports optimize safety and efficiency in their day-to-day operations.

 

A SMOOTH RIDE AHEAD FOR THE NEW PORT OF LIVERPOOL?

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

The opening of the new Liverpool2 deep sea container terminal this month seems like a piece of good news for our industry, and one that might give UK shipping a boost. This £400million investment project not only doubles the container capacity now available to shipping lines at Liverpool, but for the first time opens up the north of England to mega-carriers by providing the UK’s only deep sea container terminal north of Felixstowe.

This is a good thing. Across the world, ageing port infrastructure requires investment to upgrade facilities so they can take advantage of developments such as new smart technology and improvements in material capability. Whilst Drewry reports that the industry is expected to lose $5billion this year, so investment and evolution like this is exciting to see.

It’s encouraging to see Peel Ports investing for the future. The consolidation we’ve seen over the last few years between shipping lines has seen powerful alliances emerge and there’s no doubt they are flexing their muscles and putting pressure on ports and terminals to improve the physical facilities they offer.

Alongside these sizeable alliances, another factor driving competition between ports is of course the size of the containerships themselves. Accommodating these mega-carriers creates a real and immediate need to expand infrastructure, and is now a commercial necessity if ports are to secure future contracts with shipping lines and alliances.

Liverpool2 has recognized this and risen to the challenge, opening up new opportunities for shipping in the UK. It’s positive news for our industry and let’s hope that mega-containerships are soon spotted travelling up and down the River Mersey.

 

10 ESSENTIAL CONSIDERATIONS WHEN SPECIFYING

1. Evaluate supplier solutions based on whole life costs

You need to ensure you’re getting the best value over the full lifecycle of your products.  Buy cheap, buy twice, as they say.

2. Put emphasis on engineering capability

Evaluate the track record of your supplier closely. With ports and terminals becoming increasingly complex to accommodate the demands of modern vessels, it’s essential your supplier can demonstrate engineering experience and expertise that aligns with the needs of your project.

3. Consult shortlisted suppliers early in the project development

The earlier you consult suppliers, the more tailored your solution can be. Consult your suppliers at the conceptual design stage to ensure you get the bespoke package that really fits your requirements and guarantees optimum performance.

4. Insist on dealing with technical engineers as well as sales / bus dev personnel

If you don’t feel completely assured of your supplier’s technical expertise, determine their credentials by asking to deal with technical engineers. Your point of contact in the sales or business development team should be able to facilitate a discussion or find you the answers you need.

5. Inspect the suppliers facilities in person

If your supplier can’t give you access to their manufacturing facilities, alarm bells should be ringing.  Furthermore, you’re entitled to witness the testing procedures your products undergo. Get the reassurance you need to ensure you’re getting what you pay for.

6. Ask to witness testing

Your supplier should be able to offer you the opportunity to witness materials or full scale testing: ask for it.  Don’t let your supplier get off easy by just handing you the paperwork.

7. Explore suppliers’ track record

A robust track record should give you some confidence, but make sure your supplier has experience in your application.  A full track record should come as standard: expect it.

8. Demand samples and check certification of materials and processes

When specifying fenders, ask for a sample of the rubber compound that will be used in your project. Three key factors – velocity factor, temperature factor and longevity are affected by rubber grade and compound formulation. The properties of fenders vary dramatically depending on their composition, as such; rubber compound composition should be built into specifications in order to guarantee performance and lifecycle.

9. Get the training you and your people need

Your relationship with your supplier shouldn’t end at installation.  Demand maintenance and operational training to ensure you optimise performance in the field.

10. Ask about aftersales service

Full after sales support should be considered as part of your supplier’s offer. Not only should they be able to supply product training, spare parts and servicing should be available to you on demand, no matter where you are in the world.

 

APPLYING THE RIGHT CORRECTION FACTORS

Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems


Some of my colleagues will be attending the Port and Terminal Technology Conference in Virginia this week. The conference explores the latest developments, issues, trends and technology affecting ports and terminals around the globe, so it’s a great platform to meet with the wider industry and share ideas and best practice.

At the conference, my colleague Mishra Kumar will present a technical paper, “Applying the right correction factors” discussing the importance of applying the right Velocity Correction Factor (VCF) and Temperature Correction Factor (TCF) when specifying marine fenders.

Rubber type and compound formulation undoubtedly have a dramatic impact on the performance and lifecycle of fender systems. It’s essential that specifiers understand the difference that low quality compounds can have on performance – and the impact that rubber type and formulation have on VCF and TCF.

Last year, it’s safe to say we really put our money where our mouth is and delved in depth on the difference between high quality and low cost fenders. Having developed new analytical and chemical tests to determine fender composition, we found some dramatic differences between two fenders which were claimed to be designed to the same specification.

The paper Mishra will be presenting at the conference builds on that work and discusses the impact that these differing formulations have on VCF and TCF – which can’t be applied correctly unless the rubber compound and formulation are properly understood.

PORTS PRIMED FOR INVESTMENT SURGE

By Richard Hepworth, managing director of Trelleborg Marine Systems

Ports primed for investment surge

It’s immensely pleasing, despite the global downturn, that port owners contractors and consultants are optimistic enough to predict that capital expenditure will rise or at least stay the same over the next 12 months.

At least that was the view of most (55%) decision makers we polled last year as part of a comprehensive market report on the ports, harbours and terminal sector. The Barometer Report, conducted with Port Strategy magazine, also revealed that operational expenditure will remain at current levels or increase with 60% backing this claim.

The apparent optimism is good for the market and good for the economies of the world, which need investment in the global ports to drive trading growth. But I must also sound a note of caution. While the short term outlook is much improved, our research also reveals that these decision makers don’t necessarily expect investment to return to the levels we enjoyed a few years ago. Almost two thirds think it could be less or, at best, static.

The risk of this is only too real. There is a fear that not enough investment will come through to offset the reduction in maintenance we’ve witnessed during the global recession. Ports, harbours and terminals need to embrace the ethos of making adequate investment now to ward off the future costs of downtime.

Trelleborg’s Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from Takes the Pressure Off.