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Tag Archives: port infrastructure

TRELLEBORG TO OPEN 2017 LNG SHIP-SHORE INTERFACE CONFERENCE

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation will deliver the welcoming address at The LNG World Shipping Ship/Shore Interface Conference, which will be held at the ILEC Conference Centre (stand 1) in London, England, 16-17 November 2017.

Organized by LNG World Shipping, The LNG Ship/Shore Interface Conference provides invaluable best practice insight to all stakeholders in the LNG transportation supply chain. This event will focus on the ship/shore interface, where LNG carrier and terminal operations link to load or discharge LNG and the most delicate point in the supply chain for cargo and custody transfer systems, berthing and escort tugs, mooring and jetty arrangements and cargo-handling equipment performance.

Delivered by Dave Pendleton, Managing Director of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation UK, the welcoming address will discuss the importance of innovation and collaboration around the ship shore interface for LNG transfer.  At the conference, Trelleborg will also provide an update on the latest developments in the mid-scale LNG market. Andrew Stafford, Technical Director of Trelleborg Marine Systems operation in UK will present how Trelleborg’s latest SmartPort enabled Gen 3 ship shore link has been designed to provide complete flexibility for increasing variety of LNG markets and applications. ’.

At 258MT last year was a record for LNG trade, and with more liquefaction and import capacity coming on line in the near future and over 800MT of proposed liquefaction projects in planning, innovation around the ship-shore interface will be a key enabler in supporting the growth, flexibility and diversification of the LNG market.

From terminals to trucks, jetties to jettyless, floating to fixed, ship to shore, ship to ship industry professionals from many different disciplines will share their views about how the ship shore interface may evolve to the benefit of our customers.

The safe, efficient transportation and transfer of LNG as a cargo has had an enviable safety record over its 40 year history. Over that period many different ideas have been brought forward which are now accepted industry practice and industry standards. The LNG Ship/Shore Interface Conference will provide the ideal platform to discuss our commitment to maintaining this record by helping ports, terminals and vessels take a smarter approach to interfaces between units in LNG transfer, which can have a huge impact on overall efficiency.

For more information about The LNG Ship/Shore Interface Conference or to register your attendance, visit: http://www.lngshippingconference.com

TRELLEBORG TO SHOWCASE EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN LINK TECHNOLOGY AT TANKER SHIPPING & TRADE 2017

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation will showcase its Emergency Shutdown Link (ESL) technology for the Oil and Chemical Tanker industry at The 2017 Tanker Shipping & Trade Conference (stand 1, 14 – 15 November) in London, UK.

The Tanker Shipping and Trade Conference and Awards is a two day event that covers the commercial, operational and technical issues impacting the crude, product and chemical tanker trades.

Linked ship/shore ESD systems have long been present in LNG and LPG transfer operations as a key safety feature. Similar safety issues also exist between ship and shore in the transfer of oil and chemicals, however there has been no industry standard that has been available to guide developments.

The ESL is designed to meet the Oil Companies International Marine Forum’s (OCIMF) recommendations for linked Ship/Shore Emergency Shutdown (ESD) Systems for oil and chemical tankers. Introduced in April 2017 and published in conjunction with the Chemical Distribution Institute, the guideline provides a welcome step in the evolution of safety and regulations in the oil and chemical transfer arena that we hope, in time, it will be included in project requirements. We look forward to discussing our compliant ESL at the conference and hearing the latest experiences and opinions of those across the market.

The recommendations suggest best practice for connections between ship and terminal ESD systems through the implementation of a linked ESD system, so that ESD activation by either the terminal or ship will stop cargo transfer operations. They specify an electrical umbilical incorporating 5-pin twist connectors, for universal adoption. Minimum initiators for an ESD are a manual trip or auto trip on power fail, with optional initiators including fire detection, tank overfill, loss of containment and activation of loading arm release.

Trelleborg, alongside other suppliers, advised the OCIMF on the systems guidelines in the document. The Trelleborg ESL system features an industry standard 5-pin twist connector along with intrinsically safe circuitry, suitable for hazardous area applications, ensuring galvanic isolation between ship and shore. A simple test function is also provided.

For more information about The Tanker Shipping & Trade Conference or to register your attendance, visit: http://www.tankershippingconference.com

 

 

TRELLEBORG TO EXHIBIT AT 8TH MOTORSHIP GAS FUELLED SHIPS CONFERENCE

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation will showcase its Universal Safety Link (USL) technology at The 8th Motorship Gas Fuelled Ships Conference (13 – 15 November) onboard the Viking Mariella in Helsinki.

The conference offers a technical perspective on the innovation and investment driving the uptake of LNG, methanol and other low-flashpoint fuels in the commercial shipping sector. With a focus on knowledge sharing from a variety of projects, the conference examines the latest advances in vessel design and operation, propulsion, supply infrastructure and associated technology.

At the conference, Steve Ward, Technical Sales Manager of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation UK, will also take to the stage to provide an overview of the developments in Emergency Shutdown (ESD) and Ship-Shore Link (SSL) System technology over the last decade. He will discuss the need for standardisation and compatibility across markets.

The conference provides the ideal platform for us to connect with ship owners and operators, LNG carriers, shipbuilders, as well as port and terminal owners and operators in the region to discuss the importance of specifying compatible and proven technology and its role in ensuring the safe, efficient transportation and transfer of LNG as a fuel.

For more information about The Motorship Gas Fuelled Ships Conference, visit: http://www.motorship.com/gfsconference

 

 

TRELLEBORG RECEIVES HILTI ANCHOR DESIGN TRAINING

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation recently became the first marine fender manufacturer globally to receive extensive anchor design software training from Hilti, after hosting the manufacturer of chemical anchor fasteners at its Engineering and Design Center of Excellence in Ahmedabad, India.

The training saw Hilti experts showcase how Trelleborg engineers can utilize their software to calculate the required resin length for anchors up to M39 in size. Other areas of in-depth analysis included the types of chemicals used in Hilti’s anchor fasteners, their bond strengths and how its fasteners are installed on concrete berthing structures.

Mission critical equipment such as fender systems need to be installed correctly, and anchors play a fundamental role in ensuring that they are, and that they can successfully provide a first line of defence for ports.

With a superior resin strength to its competitors, Hilti’s wide range of injectable mortars are widely regarded as the leading solution used at ports and terminals across the globe. Therefore, it is vital that when designing our anchors, our team ensure they are fully compatible with Hilti’s mortars. The training provided us with everything we need to know to do so.

To accommodate increasing vessel sizes with optimal performance and efficiency, many of Trelleborg’s fenders require anchors larger than M39 in size, beyond the remit of Hilti’s anchor design software. Therefore our engineers have established a proprietary tool to calculate the required resin length for such anchors.

Hilti’s training provided the ideal platform to validate the calculation tool that our team has developed internally, and with the help of their experts establish industry testing requirements for chemical anchors larger than M39, helping to eliminate the use of low quality chemical anchor fasteners across the globe.

Trelleborg’s Hilti training is part of a new initiative for engineers at our Engineering and Design Center of Excellence. The initiative provides practical exposure to those that primarily work in a software-based environment.

 

TALKING SMARTER APPROACHES TO PORT INFRASTRUCTURE AT MENA CONFERENCE

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

The Port of Duqm is to become fully operational by 2019. The Port of Sohar is set for expansion in 2018 as per its 2040 master plan to become a major logistics hub. The Suez Canal Zone is prepared for development with new infrastructure to connect the east and west of the Nile by 2018. These examples provide just a snapshot of port authority and operator activity across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), as they continue to expand and upgrade their infrastructure to remain competitive, with a focus on optimization and innovation.

I joined industry professionals from The Dubai Maritime City Authority, The General Authority for the Suez Canal Economic Zone, The Hamburg Port Authority and more at The Port Development MENA Conference (26-28 Sept, Dubai) to discuss key challenges and debate best practice methodologies for securing, constructing and operating port infrastructure in the MENA region.

Tino Klemm, CFO of The Hamburg Port Authority discussed the inevitable major impact of The Internet of things (IoT) on the marine industry. I too discussed change, in particular disruption which has been a key area of focus for us over the last year or so. Our industry is notoriously conservative in embracing new trends and processes, but change is coming, and quickly.

This disruption, this radical shaking-up of the shipping, logistics and wider maritime business-model is already underway. I talked about ‘hypercollaboration’ – built on the idea that different stakeholders have different strengths – making partnerships throughout the supply chain and across industries not only profitable but necessary to survival, an idea that Jesse Damsky, Commercial Director at The Port of Salalah alluded to at the conference. From Amazon to Maersk and Alibaba, I’m sure we can all think of examples of tie-ups and collaborations where non-traditional players, those that understand data and smart technologies, are already transforming our sector.

So, for suppliers, it’s about acting now and taking advantage of new technology to provide ports and terminals with new ways to enhance operational efficiency.

When talking about changing business-models and increasing, technology-driven collaboration, we must also talk about standards. By that I mean common standards, the ability of different products and services to connect and talk to each other to really support improved operations. This really is critical. Smarter infrastructure needs open architecture.

If we are to facilitate hyper-collaboration and adopt smart technology on a widespread basis then ultimately a common, standardized communication platform is required. As vessels, ports and hinterland transport become part of a connected eco-system, a ‘shipping OS’ is needed – a common platform with shared standards, where data access supersedes data ownership.

Trelleborg occupies a unique position at the interface between ship and port. We are helping ships enter and leave port in the safest, most efficient way possible and for us this involves developing products and services to collaborate with third party systems and third party assets. In this way, we’re committed to ensuring port and terminal operations can connect effectively, obtaining the most complete overview of real-time data to operate in the most efficient way.

In short: change is smart; smart is now; and open and smart is best.

LOOKING FORWARD TO THE ANNUAL PORT DEVELOPMENT MENA FORUM

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

I’m pleased to announce that we are sponsoring the fourth Annual Port Development Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Forum at the end of September in Dubai, UAE.

The Forum discusses how the MENA region can keep up with disruptive new technologies to maintain its status as a maritime power.

I will also be presenting at the conference on the topic of digital and data-driven technologies and our SmartPort offering, as part of a session about successful port digitization, automation and security.

My presentation is entitled ‘A Smarter Approach to port infrastructure and communication’, and will discuss the need for greater collaboration between stakeholders, examine the changing role of equipment suppliers, discuss the storage, analysis and sharing of data through standardized, open systems and go on to explain how we are responding to these evolving market needs with SmartPort.

Other speakers include representatives from the Dubai Maritime City Authority, SOHAR Port and Freezone, Hamburg Port Authority and the General Authority for Suez Canal Economic Zone.

They will discuss the biggest challenges to the region and debate best-practice methodologies for securing, constructing and operating port infrastructure in the Middle East and North Africa. I’m very much looking forward to hearing what the other speakers have to say, and having some constructive conversations about the future of port development in our region.

The fourth Annual Port Development MENA Forum will take place from 26-28 September at the Dusit Thani Dubai.

 

COLLABORATION IS KING FOR THE HALO EFFECT

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

As part of our recent ‘Preparing for the Port of the Future’ Report, renowned futurist Gerd Leonhard highlighted the need for us an industry to get to grips with the fact that the future isn’t about doing one thing best, it’s about connecting to others that are leading in adjacent and relevant fields.

It’s in this spirit that we’ve forged a new strategic partnership with Teekay Marine Solutions which is part of Teekay, one of the world’s largest marine energy, transportation, storage and production companies.

Bringing together Trelleborg’s manufacturing capability and Teekay’s operations expertise, we’ve launched HALO Fenders, a new premium pneumatic fender offering. With stock in three strategic locations to ensure fast global delivery, there are 32 rental and service bases with a fleet of 400 fenders to ensure we can provide fast, local maintenance and repair.

Working with Teekay, we can provide a premium offering that enables operators to source, deploy and maintain pneumatic fenders safely and efficiently, with a reassuring service structure that ensures these high quality solutions are supported for the life of the project.

We’ve worked closely with Teekay to develop what we believe is an industry leading offer – and one that supports the needs of STS transfer as well as the wider marine market. I believe that HALO Fenders will offer unbeatable safety, reliability and responsiveness – enabling operators to guarantee efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

We’ll be launching HALO Fenders at Gastech in Tokyo (4-7 April), so if you’re attending come and see us on stand 16-320 in hall 2.

 

SMOKE AND MIRRORS

Understanding how materials perform and are processed will help make sure you really are getting what you pay for, says Richard Hepworth of Trelleborg.

Ports need to have confidence that equipment will perform as expected to fully protect terminals and berthing vessels and keep the port running safely and efficiently.

Fenders are an essential part of this port infrastructure and as such their ability to perform reliably day-in, day-out is also essential. But not all fenders are made equal, and even those that appear to be made out of the same material, such as rubber, differ significantly in terms of performance. This is down to a number of factors and familiarisation with these could mean the difference between a good investment and a bad one.

How fenders are built and then chemically processed determines the product’s final properties which in turn determines fender performance (read more about building and curing in fender performance here). However, as the economy has become increasingly global, it has become more difficult to be fully confident in the performance and provenance of some products. There have been instances of falsified testing information which means that it isn’t always a case of what you see is what you get. Caveat emptor definitely applies.

The good news is that Trelleborg is working to highlight these issues and, as a supplier of high quality fenders, to raise global standards in testing and performance.  We are currently undertaking a large-scale study into the impact of chemical processes on rubber fender performance – more information to follow soon!

In the meantime, being aware of quality issues and questioning suppliers to improve specification will help ensure you’re getting the right fender for the job, and more importantly one that will perform over the long-term as expected. It’s about minimizing risk, protecting investment and improving performance.

Remember if you don’t ask, you don’t get. So get familiar with fender production, ask suppliers difficult questions and give yourself peace of mind.

ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS

Richard Hepworth of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation considers whether the global shipping industry is keeping up with the technological pace of change.

No-one in the shipping industry denies that automation and Big Data will have a real impact on how we do business, our own research tells us so. But there’s a noticeable disconnect between understanding the significance and opportunities of these new technologies, and actually doing something about them.

According to Trelleborg’s upcoming Preparing for the Port of the Future Report, over 90% of ports, terminals and shippers accept the importance of Big Data, but when it comes to capturing and then interpreting different types of performance data this number drops significantly.

At a time when our industry is under pressure to reduce costs and be more efficient, embracing the opportunity to work smarter should be a priority. There are many different types of data available to port and terminal operators and shipping lines, all of which can deliver real efficiency gains. For example, electronically tracking and standardizing data on pilot performance and adherence to approach routes is monitored by less than a third of operators, yet this has significant impact on areas such as fuel efficiency, missing vessel slots and cost control.

We also know from our research that shipping lines are keen to have greater insights into the speed and angle of berthing but that currently only a fifth of ports offer this. This is just one example of many (see the full Report for more), but it shows that by putting in place smart technologies that enable more sophisticated data capture, there can be benefits for all parties, from improving customer relationships to understanding and avoiding berthing delays.

The old adage of don’t run before you can walk can be applied to Big Data. An easy first step to increase efficiency is to turn existing unstructured data into something useful. Audit, digitize and normalize existing metrics and formats to standardize data. This standardization makes analysis easier to produce informed decision-making that can refine processes, optimize efficiencies, improve safety, identify maintenance and improve customer relationships. And that’s just for starters.

It’s not a case of data becoming the new business currency, it already is. Smart technologies offer an immediate opportunity for port and terminal operators and shipping lines alike, together let’s take advantage of them now.

A SMOOTH RIDE AHEAD FOR THE NEW PORT OF LIVERPOOL?

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

The opening of the new Liverpool2 deep sea container terminal this month seems like a piece of good news for our industry, and one that might give UK shipping a boost. This £400million investment project not only doubles the container capacity now available to shipping lines at Liverpool, but for the first time opens up the north of England to mega-carriers by providing the UK’s only deep sea container terminal north of Felixstowe.

This is a good thing. Across the world, ageing port infrastructure requires investment to upgrade facilities so they can take advantage of developments such as new smart technology and improvements in material capability. Whilst Drewry reports that the industry is expected to lose $5billion this year, so investment and evolution like this is exciting to see.

It’s encouraging to see Peel Ports investing for the future. The consolidation we’ve seen over the last few years between shipping lines has seen powerful alliances emerge and there’s no doubt they are flexing their muscles and putting pressure on ports and terminals to improve the physical facilities they offer.

Alongside these sizeable alliances, another factor driving competition between ports is of course the size of the containerships themselves. Accommodating these mega-carriers creates a real and immediate need to expand infrastructure, and is now a commercial necessity if ports are to secure future contracts with shipping lines and alliances.

Liverpool2 has recognized this and risen to the challenge, opening up new opportunities for shipping in the UK. It’s positive news for our industry and let’s hope that mega-containerships are soon spotted travelling up and down the River Mersey.