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Tag Archives: port infrastructure

COLLABORATION IS KING FOR THE HALO EFFECT

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

As part of our recent ‘Preparing for the Port of the Future’ Report, renowned futurist Gerd Leonhard highlighted the need for us an industry to get to grips with the fact that the future isn’t about doing one thing best, it’s about connecting to others that are leading in adjacent and relevant fields.

It’s in this spirit that we’ve forged a new strategic partnership with Teekay Marine Solutions which is part of Teekay, one of the world’s largest marine energy, transportation, storage and production companies.

Bringing together Trelleborg’s manufacturing capability and Teekay’s operations expertise, we’ve launched HALO Fenders, a new premium pneumatic fender offering. With stock in three strategic locations to ensure fast global delivery, there are 32 rental and service bases with a fleet of 400 fenders to ensure we can provide fast, local maintenance and repair.

Working with Teekay, we can provide a premium offering that enables operators to source, deploy and maintain pneumatic fenders safely and efficiently, with a reassuring service structure that ensures these high quality solutions are supported for the life of the project.

We’ve worked closely with Teekay to develop what we believe is an industry leading offer – and one that supports the needs of STS transfer as well as the wider marine market. I believe that HALO Fenders will offer unbeatable safety, reliability and responsiveness – enabling operators to guarantee efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

We’ll be launching HALO Fenders at Gastech in Tokyo (4-7 April), so if you’re attending come and see us on stand 16-320 in hall 2.

 

SMOKE AND MIRRORS

Understanding how materials perform and are processed will help make sure you really are getting what you pay for, says Richard Hepworth of Trelleborg.

Ports need to have confidence that equipment will perform as expected to fully protect terminals and berthing vessels and keep the port running safely and efficiently.

Fenders are an essential part of this port infrastructure and as such their ability to perform reliably day-in, day-out is also essential. But not all fenders are made equal, and even those that appear to be made out of the same material, such as rubber, differ significantly in terms of performance. This is down to a number of factors and familiarisation with these could mean the difference between a good investment and a bad one.

How fenders are built and then chemically processed determines the product’s final properties which in turn determines fender performance (read more about building and curing in fender performance here). However, as the economy has become increasingly global, it has become more difficult to be fully confident in the performance and provenance of some products. There have been instances of falsified testing information which means that it isn’t always a case of what you see is what you get. Caveat emptor definitely applies.

The good news is that Trelleborg is working to highlight these issues and, as a supplier of high quality fenders, to raise global standards in testing and performance.  We are currently undertaking a large-scale study into the impact of chemical processes on rubber fender performance – more information to follow soon!

In the meantime, being aware of quality issues and questioning suppliers to improve specification will help ensure you’re getting the right fender for the job, and more importantly one that will perform over the long-term as expected. It’s about minimizing risk, protecting investment and improving performance.

Remember if you don’t ask, you don’t get. So get familiar with fender production, ask suppliers difficult questions and give yourself peace of mind.

ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS

Richard Hepworth of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation considers whether the global shipping industry is keeping up with the technological pace of change.

No-one in the shipping industry denies that automation and Big Data will have a real impact on how we do business, our own research tells us so. But there’s a noticeable disconnect between understanding the significance and opportunities of these new technologies, and actually doing something about them.

According to Trelleborg’s upcoming Preparing for the Port of the Future Report, over 90% of ports, terminals and shippers accept the importance of Big Data, but when it comes to capturing and then interpreting different types of performance data this number drops significantly.

At a time when our industry is under pressure to reduce costs and be more efficient, embracing the opportunity to work smarter should be a priority. There are many different types of data available to port and terminal operators and shipping lines, all of which can deliver real efficiency gains. For example, electronically tracking and standardizing data on pilot performance and adherence to approach routes is monitored by less than a third of operators, yet this has significant impact on areas such as fuel efficiency, missing vessel slots and cost control.

We also know from our research that shipping lines are keen to have greater insights into the speed and angle of berthing but that currently only a fifth of ports offer this. This is just one example of many (see the full Report for more), but it shows that by putting in place smart technologies that enable more sophisticated data capture, there can be benefits for all parties, from improving customer relationships to understanding and avoiding berthing delays.

The old adage of don’t run before you can walk can be applied to Big Data. An easy first step to increase efficiency is to turn existing unstructured data into something useful. Audit, digitize and normalize existing metrics and formats to standardize data. This standardization makes analysis easier to produce informed decision-making that can refine processes, optimize efficiencies, improve safety, identify maintenance and improve customer relationships. And that’s just for starters.

It’s not a case of data becoming the new business currency, it already is. Smart technologies offer an immediate opportunity for port and terminal operators and shipping lines alike, together let’s take advantage of them now.

A SMOOTH RIDE AHEAD FOR THE NEW PORT OF LIVERPOOL?

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

The opening of the new Liverpool2 deep sea container terminal this month seems like a piece of good news for our industry, and one that might give UK shipping a boost. This £400million investment project not only doubles the container capacity now available to shipping lines at Liverpool, but for the first time opens up the north of England to mega-carriers by providing the UK’s only deep sea container terminal north of Felixstowe.

This is a good thing. Across the world, ageing port infrastructure requires investment to upgrade facilities so they can take advantage of developments such as new smart technology and improvements in material capability. Whilst Drewry reports that the industry is expected to lose $5billion this year, so investment and evolution like this is exciting to see.

It’s encouraging to see Peel Ports investing for the future. The consolidation we’ve seen over the last few years between shipping lines has seen powerful alliances emerge and there’s no doubt they are flexing their muscles and putting pressure on ports and terminals to improve the physical facilities they offer.

Alongside these sizeable alliances, another factor driving competition between ports is of course the size of the containerships themselves. Accommodating these mega-carriers creates a real and immediate need to expand infrastructure, and is now a commercial necessity if ports are to secure future contracts with shipping lines and alliances.

Liverpool2 has recognized this and risen to the challenge, opening up new opportunities for shipping in the UK. It’s positive news for our industry and let’s hope that mega-containerships are soon spotted travelling up and down the River Mersey.

 

TRELLEBORG LAUNCHES NEW ISO17357-1:2014 COMPLIANT PNEUMATIC FENDER

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Remaining true to its principle of innovation, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation has launched a new ISO17357-1:2014 compliant, high performance pneumatic fender designed to address the evolving needs of ports, terminals and offshore ship-to-ship transfer applications.

The new quality assured fender features a thinner, lighter body for easier transportation and handling, improved netting and hemispherical ends designed to offer superior functional performance and enhanced continuity of end fittings for optimum deflection capability.

In addition to improvements in the design of the fender, materials have been engineered to ensure a stronger overall performance. After detailed research into optimum tire cord reinforcement, we have re-evaluated our materials to enhance fender performance.

Unlike other manufacturers that use synthetic tire cords for only the body of the fender and chafer fabric at both hemispherical ends, we now use 100% synthetic tire cord for the construction of the entire fender. This directly enhances the fender’s operational ability because synthetic tire-cord has a higher tensile strength than chafer fabric. By incorporating the synthetic tire cord into the entire fender, the stability, longevity, and shape retention of the fender are all significantly enhanced.

Demonstrating our best practice approach to delivering superior products that incorporate optimum, high quality materials, our new pneumatic fender goes above and beyond the minimum requirements of the ISO 17357-1:2014 standard which recommends the use of synthetic tire-cords but does not make it mandatory.

Trelleborg not only meets but exceeds the demands of the ISO17357-1:2014 standard with quality assurance documents and test results shared in a comprehensive, fully-authenticated supporting document package. Proof data, inner and outer rubber material specifications and pressure test data are all included as standard for even greater peace of mind.

Many suppliers however utilize low cost, low quality, non-compliant materials and fail to perform stringent materials and product testing to the requirements of the ISO standard. For instance, for the external rubber layer composition of a fender which plays a major role in its longevity, many suppliers use rubber compounds which fail to comply with the new ISO requirement.

In addition, a large number of suppliers also turn to low cost recycled rubber-based compounds. Others use chafer fabric, a cheaper alternative to tire-cord. The chafer fabric is unable to provide Minimum Endurable Pressure (MEP) at 0% and 60% deflection, which is imperative for pneumatic fenders to work efficiently in harsh conditions.

Many suppliers also reduce the number of plies, or use a reinforcing layer made from a low-cost suboptimal combination of chafer fabric and tire cord as they lack the basic design concepts to produce high quality pneumatic fenders.

Specifiers should also be wary of inefficient, cost-reducing methods used by suppliers such as the use of a heating jacket instead of a mold during the curing process. It is also critical that specifiers are aware of manufacturers claiming to be supplying ISO17357-1:2014 compliant pneumatic fenders which are actually produced using the ‘airbag’ construction method. Products constructed in this manner, are not compliant with ISO17537-1 and will not guarantee the level or longevity of performance of a ‘true’ pneumatic fender.

To find out more about the new ISO17357-1:2014 compliant, high performance pneumatic fender, download the Product Application Briefing now: http://ow.ly/tncb301PFOc.

CORPORATE AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FIRMLY ON THE AGENDA AT TRELLEBORG

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Testament to the on-going commitment to continuous improvement of the Melbourne manufacturing facility of Trelleborg marine systems operation in Australia, the company’s Environmental Management System (EMS) has been re-certified by Lloyd’s Register Quality Assurance (LRQA) to AS/NZS ISO 14001 environment management standard.

The scope of the EMS certification, which has been maintained to  AS/NZS ISO 14001 since 2010, is applicable to the design, manufacture and commissioning of jetty-based and offshore mooring equipment, monitoring and control systems.

The re-certification of ISO 14001, demonstrates our long-standing commitment to our environmental obligations. Trelleborg’s marine systems operation’s facility in Melbourne, in particular, has made significant strides to advance the environmental impact of its operations in recent years, achieving some truly outstanding results – a huge congratulations to the tireless efforts of those involved.

 

TRELLEBORG SUPPORTS PIANC IN EVOLVING FENDER BEST PRACTICE

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation has committed to supporting PIANC as the industry body focuses efforts on evolving best practice guidance for fender systems, in an effort to drive up standards and improve safety across the industry.

Trelleborg is committed to assisting PIANC wherever possible and has been a PIANC Platinum Partner since 2014. The company recently increased its involvement with the PIANC Young Professionals Commission, in particular.

We have a longstanding association with PIANC and support the important work the organization does in setting guidance for ports and vessels alike. Recently however, we’ve really focused on backing the Young Professionals’ programs run by PIANC.

I see these as the most critical audience, since the young engineers being trained and supported now will go on to shape the future of our industry. With the world we are living in changing so rapidly, we must make sure they are well placed to evolve our industry and ensure we remain relevant within it.”

Trelleborg sponsored the 2nd PIANC YP-COM Asian Seminar in the Philippines, with our materials expert, Mishra Kumar, speaking on ‘New trends and the development of fenders’. Pablo Arecco, YP-Com Chairman also visited our facility in the Philippines with two young people from the PIANC’s Commission.

During PIANC’s Singapore Young Professional’s event the following week, Louis van Schel, Secretary-General at PIANC, and other young people from the commission were invited to Trelleborg’s marine systems office in Singapore and its fender manufacturing facility. Trelleborg and PIANC held extensive talks on the best way to approach potential updates to PIANC’s 2002 ‘Guidelines for the Design of Fender Systems’, in order to ensure falsified test certification is eliminated from the industry.

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TRELLEBORG ANNOUNCES LAUNCH OF TECHNICAL SEMINAR ROAD TRIP

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation in Dubai is to hit the road following the launch of its first ever technical seminar road trip across the Middle East from 24th April to 4th May.

Unlike your average seminar series, the road trip will see Trelleborg deliver one-day technical seminars straight to customers’ doors, across the Middle East, with one-day events in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; Damman, Saudi Arabia; Kuwait City, Kuwait; Bahrain City, Bahrain; Dubai, UAE; and Aqaba, Jordan. The road trip is specifically designed to provide port authorities and consultants with everything they need to know about Trelleborg’s latest developments in port and terminal infrastructure.

The events will see the experts at Trelleborg discuss a range of key industry issues including marine fender best practice and the latest guidelines for docking and mooring systems. Technical expert Mishra Kumar will also be on hand to discuss the importance of ingredient selection, mixing and the manufacturing process in marine fenders.

As our commitment to taking a smarter approach to port and terminal optimization continues to grow, the road trip provides the ideal platform to highlight the importance of specifying smart, engineered solutions for port approach, berthing, docking and mooring to those across a region that is rapidly becoming a global shipping hub.

For more information about the road trip, or if you’d like to register your attendance, contact Anu Bhaskar: anu.bhaskar@trelleborg.com

TRELLEBORG HOSTS PORT PERFORMANCE SEMINAR IN GREECE

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation hosted an exclusive one-day seminar for port authorities and consultants in partnership with the company’s exclusive agent for Greece, Seamark Marine on 1st March at the Metropolitan Chandris Hotel in Athens, Greece.

The free seminar saw experts at Trelleborg discuss a range of key industry issues including marine fender selection, infrastructure regulation, the latest in docking and mooring technology, and floating fender and buoy design. In addition, the importance of rubber compound composition in the whole-life performance of fender systems was also on the agenda.

The seminar provided the ideal platform for us to connect with port authorities and consultants to discuss the importance of taking a smarter approach to port and terminal equipment optimization through the specification of smart, engineered solutions for port approach, berthing, docking and mooring. This will enable ports and terminals to reap the rewards of better informed real-time and strategic decision making, both onshore and on board the vessel.

Following on from the seminar in Athens we will host further one-day events across Europe, which we’ll be revealing more information about in due course.

TRELLEBORG REPORT HIGHLIGHTS POTENTIAL OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Our latest Barometer Report, which discusses the issues impacting ports and terminals around the globe, revealed that over 40% of the port owners and operators surveyed have experienced an increase in throughput in the last twelve months.

To accommodate the higher levels of throughput, demanded by larger ships carrying more cargo, ports should look increasingly towards automated or ‘smart’ technologies.

Automated technology has a significant role to play in delivering greater operational efficiency, reducing unit costs by helping to process cargo more quickly and more consistently. This principle and drive for efficient turnaround should extend to the jetty side too. There is a vast opportunity to reduce human error and refine scheduling as vessels come in to port, berth and are dispatched.

While the wider transport and logistics sector is relatively advanced in its grasp and use of ‘smart’ technology, the ‘Internet of Things’ mentality is not necessarily translating quickly within ports and terminals. The more rapidly we take a smarter approach to connecting equipment, the quicker we can collect and analyze data from it – and the sooner we’ll improve efficiency.

With that in mind, it’s positive that 74% of those surveyed are open to new technologies, showing a willingness to adapt and improve. The industry is beginning to look forward and embrace new trends, which is reflected by the fact that so many are now using one or more forms of automated technology.

Only 7% say they don’t use any automated systems – instead, relying on human or manual guidance at their facilities. This is much less than last year, when 19% said the same, while in 2013 we observed that the market was lagging behind the technology available to it.

While the use of automated technologies continues to grow, so too does our commitment to taking a smarter approach to port and terminal efficiency, and extending the automation that is becoming increasingly well-established on the land side, to the jetty side too. This commitment was highlighted by our recent acquisition of Marimatech, whose navigation and ship positioning product line utilize the latest ‘smart’ technology. These are to be integrated with our existing product range and will further strengthen our offering as a turnkey supplier of systems for both ship and terminal owners.

To download the Barometer Report 5, visit: http://ow.ly/VmYR3