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Tag Archives: marine

TRELLEBORG LAUNCHES ANNUAL BAROMETER REPORT

We are delighted to announce that we have launched our fifth annual Barometer Report, which calls on the views of 200 port owners, operators, consulting engineers and contractors.

This year’s report takes a look back over the last five years to see how attitudes to investment, maintenance and quality have changed over time.

In previous years, the Barometer Report has examined the issues helping and hindering port performance over a 12 month period. This year however, we decided to find out how attitudes to investment, maintenance and quality have changed over the last five years.

During this time, ports have had to batten down the hatches in the grips of the recession, and have largely made the most of the situation they were faced with. However, as this year’s report highlights, the mist is beginning to lift, with last year’s anticipated budget boost now materializing. So much so, the majority of port owners and operators have the opportunity to invest more strategically in smart technologies and supplier service in a bid to improve long-term product performance.

One cause for concern though, is that while levels of unscheduled downtime have decreased over time, unscheduled downtime caused by fender damage has increased significantly in the last 12 months. As such, port owners, operators, consultants and contractors need to ensure they are not replacing like-for-like out of habit – but investing in quality solutions that will perform well over a long design life.

As discussed within the latest Barometer Report, supplier expertise should guide procurement decisions, and technology should enable owners and operators to minimize maintenance requirements.

To download the Barometer Report 5, visit: http://ow.ly/TA6uR

TRELLEBORG COMPLETES ACQUISITION OF MARITIME INTERNATIONAL

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

I’m delighted to report that today, we completed the acquisition of Maritime International, Inc., a U.S. based company which specializes in the design and manufacture of fender systems and a number of other quay wall accessories. Maritime International also has the capability to design and fabricate a wide range of steel structures for the marine market.

As well as the obvious similarities and synergies between our product portfolios, the two companies are very closely aligned in terms of values.  Both are committed to design and engineering excellence, with a particular focus on in-house expertise and customer support.

I’m looking forward to working closely with our new colleagues to share best practices and processes across both businesses, and continuing to deliver the highest quality products to our customers.

We recently opened our new American headquarters in Berryville, Virginia, and with our Houston office, the acquisition takes our sites in North America up to four, with Maritime’s head office and main manufacturing facility in Broussard, Louisiana, and a second quayside manufacturing facility in Port of Vermilion, Louisiana.

We’ve committed significant resource to the region in the past year, and the acquisition is just the latest step we’ve taken to allow us to better serve our customers here, as well as reinforcing Trelleborg’s leading position globally.

I’ll leave you with a few words from David LeBlanc, president at Maritime International.  I’ve spent a lot of time with David in the lead up to the announcement, and look forward to continuing to work with him to make sure the transition is as smooth as possible for both our employees and our customers.

“We’ve built a strong reputation in North America, and now boosted by the financial strength of Trelleborg, we look forward to continuing to provide the excellent products and services that customers from both legacy companies have come to expect.”

SEE YOU AT KORMARINE 2015!

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

At the end of October, we will be exhibiting at Kormarine 2015, a leading marine trade exhibition which takes place at the BEXCO (Busan Exhibition & Convention Center), in Busan, Korea and covers international marine, shipbuilding, offshore and oil and gas industries.

At the event, we’re pleased to be demonstrating our new Integrated Ship Shore Link (SSL) and Emergency Shutdown System (ESDS) for the marine LNG industry.

Attracting around 40,000 visitors, Kormarine is the largest marine trade exhibition, covering both commercial and military shipbuilding.

Trelleborg Marine Systems has a major centrer in Busan supporting all of our Oil and Gas Transfer and Vessel Technology products. At the event, representatives from our Busan office, and from the wider business, will be on stand to meet attendees and discuss the latest developments in the Korean market, as well as our experiences in the LNG industry globally.

As well as the new integrated ESDS/SSL system we will also be showcasing our ship performance technology as well as our Worldwide Service capability.

To find out more, visit us at Kormarine 2015 on booth number 5K17, in Hall 5, from the 20 to 23 October. We look forward to meeting you there!

TRELLEBORG ENGINEER JOINS PRESTIGIOUS GASTECH YOUNG ENGINEER FOUNDATION

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

We call ourselves the Performance People because we ensure the right support is in place for our customers from conceptual design to after sales care. To enable us to deliver truly end-to-end service to our customers, we’re committed to the professional development of our staff.

With that in mind, I am delighted to reveal that Matthew Walker, Project Engineer at our operation in Australia has been handpicked to join the esteemed Gastech Young Engineer Foundation (GYEF).

Given the growing need to attract young talent to the energy industry, the GYEF recognizes and supports the next generation of engineers. The GYEF’s committee, which represents several leading figures in the global energy industry, selected Matthew as one of just 80 successful candidates from several hundred applicants.

Bolstering the professional development of engineers in the early stages of their career, the GYEF has awarded Matthew access to an exclusive package of educational and networking opportunities. This includes a complementary delegate pass for the 2015 Gastech Conference & Exhibition in Singapore (27th – 30th October 2015), providing the opportunity to connect and network with peers and industry leaders. In addition, Matthew has also been awarded a lifetime membership to Gastech’s Young Engineer Alumni and granted unlimited access to online mentoring from thought leaders through a dedicated section of the GYEF website.

For Matthew to be recognized so enthusiastically at such an early stage in his career is a phenomenal feat. We hold a long-standing commitment to the professional development of our staff, and this is testament to our ability to produce industry ready talent.

To find out more about The Gastech Young Engineer Foundation, visit: http://www.youngengineersfoundation.com/

TRELLEBORG TO SHOWCASE NAVIGATION BUOYS AT SEAWORK 2015 INTERNATIONAL

Ashley Tasker, Global Business Development Manager for Marine Products at Trelleborg Marine Systems

I am delighted to reveal that we will showcase our innovative range of IALA compliant modular navigation buoys at Seawork 2015 International, the largest and fastest growing international commercial marine and workboat exhibition and conference held in a European working port environment (16th to 18th June).

Our unique, comprehensive range of navigation buoys provides a solution to fit all demanding requirements – in addition to our standard range, we are able to manufacture to specification where required. The modular system provides an easily transported option to cut down turnaround time and enable fast installation, as they can be shipped in sections and assembled on site.

Manufactured from impact resistant, colour-fast, UV stable materials and comprising of sectional hull pieces filled with marine grade, water-resistant foam, Trelleborg’s range of IALA compliant modular navigation buoys is built around a hot dipped galvanised steel core. Available as standard in diameters ranging from 1.25 to 3.6 meters, Trelleborg will also manufacture precisely to specification where required.

We will also be taking the opportunity to showcase our range of Foam / Elastomer constructed mooring buoys. Thanks to their low maintenance, self-fendering resilient foam bodies and their ease of handling and repair whilst offshore, these are rapidly replacing traditional steel mooring buoys.

Our booth will also feature our pneumatic and foam fenders. As an ideal ship protection medium for load sensitive structures such as LNG vessels and ocean platforms, our range of pneumatic fenders feature high energy absorption with low reaction force. While our foam fenders are super tough due to a unique manufacturing process and have high energy absorption for their reactive load.

If you’re heading to Seawork 2015 and want to find out more, come and see us at booth number A187.

Alternatively, visit: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/

TRELLEBORG TAKES TO PREVENTION FIRST 2014 TO DISCUSS END-TO-END SERVICE OFFERING

October’s “Prevention First: An Onshore and Offshore Pollution Prevention Symposium & Technology Exhibition”, provided the ideal platform to discuss the importance of technical and aftersales support, and the service Trelleborg Marine Systems offers.

Here at Trelleborg, we offer a complete range of fendering, docking and mooring solutions, as well as a one-stop-shop for technical, operational and maintenance support.  Our most recent Barometer Report revealed a huge gap in the maintenance requirements of port owners and operators, and the support that suppliers are able to provide. So it was great to use the exhibition as a platform to connect with stakeholders to discuss where suppliers fall short and what more we can do to give them the support they need.

Ultimately, successful projects engage suppliers from the earliest possible stages, to get input and guidance on what will be the most appropriate solution on a case-by-case basis. That’s why we provide stakeholders with support from the earliest design stages to aftersales support. In particular, it was great to discuss our program for the North American market, and its development in accordance with OCIMF, SIGTTO and PIANC guidelines.

We also had a comprehensive team of sales and technical experts on stand to take visitors through the role Trelleborg played in the first phase of implementation of the Marine Oil Terminal Engineering and Maintenance Standards (MOTEMS). The standards apply to all existing and new marine oil terminals in California, and include criteria for inspection, structural analysis and design including mooring and berthing requirements.

The Prevention First exhibition is organised by the California State Lands Commission (CSLC), which sets the requirements for marine jetties throughout California.

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Home/

 

 

 

AN OPTIMISTIC OUTLOOK ON PORT INVESTMENT

Our latest Barometer Report has revealed the most optimistic outlook on investment since we began surveying the industry back in 2010.

We found that 93% of port owners and operators expect capital expenditure budgets to increase over the next 12 months, and 88% expect operational expenditure budgets to grow too. The picture was even brighter when we surveyed consultants and contractors, with 98% expecting both CapEx and OpEx to grow.

This is certainly a positive step, but those increased budgets need to be spent strategically to really help ports to increase efficiencies which, unfortunately, doesn’t really seem to be happening at the moment. 61% of consultants and contractors felt that their clients were concerned by upfront purchase costs, rather than prioritising whole life value. Seemingly, attitudes towards procurement still need to change.

To me, this focus on up-front purchase cost may have been understandable while we were suffering the effects of the economic downturn, but with budgets expected to rise, the industry as a whole needs to take steps to ensure we implement high-quality solutions.

The report revealed that ports are already under pressure to adapt to increasingly complex demands on infrastructure – they risk falling further behind if they don’t act now to optimise new investment opportunities.

Ultimately, though, I take a positive message away from the findings of the report: as the market continues to strengthen, there’s an opportunity to take a bold and deliberate step to get ahead of demand and invest strategically now.

The have a look at the full results of the latest Barometer Report, visit the Trelleborg Marine Systems website.

PORTS CLAIM PIANC CERTIFICATION KEY TO COMPLIANCE AND REGULATION

The results of our latest Barometer Report show that the majority (65%) of port owners, operators and contractors request and check PIANC certification to ensure that marine fenders are sold as described.

Although it’s reassuring to see that the majority of respondents do request certification, it’s important that owners and operators understand exactly what to look for. PIANC is undoubtedly an important standard bearer for quality and performance, but it doesn’t have the legal mandate to enforce standards across the industry.

At present, it’s too easy to gain PIANC certification, with some of the more unscrupulous traders using this to their advantage by applying certification to entire product lines or factories, rather than to specific product batches and compound formulations.

In comparison to last year’s report, which revealed that just under 80% of respondents were struggling to get to grips with unscheduled downtime, this year’s Barometer reveals that, alarmingly, over 90% are now suffering, which suggests to me that the emphasis placed on checking certification in theory, is not necessarily translating to best practice.

It’s therefore imperative that equipment specifiers, for mission critical equipment such as fenders, begin to take necessary steps to ensure that the products they are buying are truly “as described”.

I’d like to get your thoughts on the matter. How much importance do you put by third party certification and design approvals when procuring mission critical equipment? Let us know in the comments section.

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Home/

SEE YOU AT PREVENTION FIRST 2012

Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems

Some of my colleagues will be attending the Prevention First Conference in Long Beach, California at the end of the month.  The conference discusses a number of issues that are important to us and the wider industry, so it’s a great platform to exhibit our products and solutions, and to meet with the wider industry and share ideas and best practice.

At the conference, we’ll also be discussing some new tests that we’ve recently developed. These analytical and physical tests help buyers to determine the quality of rubber through chemical composition analysis.

We took samples from two commercial sized fenders (ours and a low cost suppliers) and sent them to an independent third party laboratory, where they were tested using our newly developed methods.

The results revealed that low cost fenders are made of low grade recycled rubber and have inferior mechanical properties. There was a significant difference in performance between the two fenders during compression tests.

Our research indicated that rubber composition has a profound effect on the durability and performance of the fenders.  Moreover, the velocity and temperature factors are significantly affected by the composition of the rubber compound. Velocity and temperature factors are key when setting out to accurately calculate the performance of a fender.

Determining accurate performance of marine fenders means maximum protection of the port infrastructure and the vessels that come to berth there.

Our research results showed that rubber fenders that are produced mostly from synthetic rubber have far higher velocity and temperature correction factors when compared with natural rubber based fenders. Our findings also indicated that higher percentages of recycled rubber in the rubber formulation lead to a substantial overall reduction to the life cycle and the performance of fenders.

Cheap fenders offer an upfront cost saving at the expense of both performance and longevity. As is often the case, you get what you pay for, and what appears to be “lower cost” probably is, due to the fact that it is made of low cost materials.  One should consider the impact this has to overall operating costs, including more frequent fender replacement, higher maintenance costs and down time.

To give it its full name, the “Prevention First: An Onshore and Offshore Pollution Prevention Symposium & Technology Exhibition” will take place on the 23rd and 24th October 2012.

The exhibition will host over 400 representatives from a range of backgrounds within the public sector and private industry, if you’re one of them, be sure to stop by booth 30 to find out more about our test methods and our findings.

SHIP TO SHIP FOR FLNG – CONSIDER THE BIGGER PICTURE

Tom Toth, Technical Manager for Offshore Integrated Mooring, Trelleborg Marine Systems

With the Petrobas’ jetty in Bahia, Brazil currently under construction and  the conversion  of LNGC Golar Winter to a Floating Storage and Regasification Unit (FSRU), which will be moored alongside: how important is it to have an one party with oversight of the design requirements of the FSRU, jetty and Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier (LNGC)?

FSRUs provide an economical alternative to land based fixed LNG import terminals, offering  relatively short lead time to start up, significantly lower capital cost to construct and the ability to cater to difficult to access or isolated locations. They can also provide effective interim solutions before a major onshore terminal is built.

Essentially, the FSRU (a ship like facility) can take the place of an onshore LNG import terminal with a regasification plant, thereby acting as a floating LNG import terminal. The majority of FSRUs are semi-permanently moored to a land based or isolated jetty-like structure and receive natural gas in a liquefied state from LNG carriers (LNGC) that berth alongside in a moored ship-to-ship (STS) configuration.

An important consideration to ensure the success of these increasingly prevalent projects is the need for the FSRU, jetty and LNGC to be considered holistically in the design phase. To achieve efficient operation, docking and mooring solutions between FSRU, jetty and LNGC should be seamlessly integrated and developed mutually inclusively.

However, we are often finding demarcation in design of the mooring interfaces between the FSRU and jetty, and between the FSRU and LNGC.  Unfortunately, the ‘greyness’ of technical specifications and the split of key components within mooring and berthing packages can often lead to interface or integration  incompatibilities once the FSRU is in operation.

With the FSRU’s development entrusted to a dedicated ship designer, and the jetty being designed separately, the interfaces between the FLNG, jetty and LNGC need careful consideration with regard to the interface protocols, communications methodology and the hardware that makes the physical connections. This is to ensure that all entities work seamlessly together to avoid operational issues.

The FSRU vessel, rather than the jetty, will generally be the central control centre for loading operations and the consolidation point for mooring tension, met ocean monitoring, emergency mooring release and a host of other ship to ship and ship to shore facilities.  As such, the jetty and LNGC’s operations are dependent on the FSRU, as the efficiency of the FSRU itself is dependent on smooth operations between the other two entities.

Class Rules apply to the construction and equipment installed on the FSRU, however, they are generally not applicable to the design of the jetty or the mooring system.   Marine guidelines published by OCIMF and SIGTTO cover recommendations for both jetty and vessel but these are not mandatory. It is therefore important that there is a party that will cast a “birds eye view” over the entire facility, inclusively of all three entities.

The case of the Bahia LNG import terminal, which is currently under construction, could be considered an excellent model, since both the FSRU and jetty side design have been considered holistically by all the key stakeholders. Our OIM team have worked closely with the relevant parties to provide an integrated docking and mooring solution that should satisfy the operational needs of the jetty, FSRU and LNGC.

Having had an overview of the design requirements for both, we have been able to add value to the project by providing our input across both FSRU and jetty facility designers and this should ensure that the systems operational interfaces are aligned and considered well before the construction stage.

Any modifications or changes needed once the FSRU is in service will be costly and potentially impractical to implement.  Such problems are easily avoided when the shared needs of FSRU, jetty and LNGC are considered holistically and developed to complement each other at the design stage.