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Tag Archives: fenders

SOUTHAMPTON CONTAINER TERMINAL TURNS TO TRELLEBORG TO ENABLE BERTHING OF LARGER VESSELS

We were recently awarded the contract to supply over 70 Unit Element fender systems to DP World, Southampton, which will berth the latest ultra-large container ships.

I believe that our consistency in performance and engineering expertise has supported our relationship with the terminal.  We’ve worked together for a while now, and this contract brings total amount of fenders supplied to over 110.

Brin Humphreys, head of Engineering at DP World Southampton, said: “Due to the proven performance of the systems supplied by Trelleborg, we had no hesitation in turning to them once again. It was clear they had the capabilities to successfully deliver our expectations and requirements again.”

We have worked closely with DP World Southampton for over 10 years, first installing our Unit Element fenders in 1996 on SCT 1 Berth.

When refurbishment began on SCT berths 2, 3 and 4, in 2011, DP World chose us to keep the solution in line with SCT 1. We are delighted that we yet again had the opportunity to work with DP World Southampton using our unique solutions for such an important project.

On completion of the current project, Southampton will offer 1.87 kilometres of deep water quay, with up to 16 meters depth alongside. In addition, the 16 quayside gantry cranes with super post panamax capacity will allow for berthing of vessels over 400 meters in length.

It is vital that infrastructure keeps up with the ever increasing size of vessels and therefore we are delighted to be designing, manufacturing and installing our bespoke fender systems for a facility that places such importance on proactively keeping up with demand.

 

 

JEBEL ALI PORT RECOGNISES IMPORTANCE OF RUBBER SPECIFICATION

We are proud to announce the introduction of our rubber quality standards at the world’s largest man-made harbor – The Jebel Ali Port in Dubai. We have been working on the Quay Four refurbishment project with DP world since 2011, and have now completed installation with 60 super cone SCN 1300 fenders to project berths 18 and 19.

Super Cone fenders provide optimal performance and efficiency. The unique design makes them an excellent choice in terms of stability, strength and also resistance to over-compression.

The addition of analytical tests to verify the quality of rubber used in the fenders has ensured us to really reassure the port that the high-performance required for this project will be met.

As the biggest port in the Middle East and a supplier to the global market, we are delighted that DP world has shown commitment to superior solutions by building rubber quality standards in to their fender specifications.

Thanks to our entirely in-house approach, we could even personalise the solution for DP World by including the DP World Logo on the UHMW PE face pads of the fenders.

I will leave you with a few words from Hesham Abdulla, Container Terminal 1 director of DP world, who said: “Trelleborg was able to offer technical support across all parts of the system, from ensuring the rubber element would precisely meet specification, to chains and accessories. Their support and local presence meant that they were a natural choice to supply the project and thanks to their in-house manufacturing capabilities we could even have the solution personalised.”

PORTS CRYING OUT FOR EXTERNAL SUPPORT FOR EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATION

Our latest Barometer Report revealed that the majority (77%) of consultants and contractors don’t know the correct ratio of ingredients in a superior rubber compound for use in fenders.

To me, this suggests a huge gap in specification knowledge and product awareness, and that needs to be addressed. As we’ve talked about frequently in this blog, the performance and lifecycle of fenders vary dramatically based on the type of rubber used, and within that, the compound composition of the rubber.

And whilst many lacked awareness of the importance of compound formulation, what’s more, 50% of those surveyed don’t know if suppliers apply bespoke Velocity Factor (VF). 53% are also unaware if suppliers apply bespoke Temperature Factor (TF).

The application of VF and TF on a case by case basis is essential in determining fender performance and lifecycle. First introduced by PIANC, VF and TF should be applied to fenders depending on the compound composition of the rubber to accurately ascertain performance in the field, under varying compression times and temperatures.

Its no surprise then, that the study also revealed 86% of those surveyed would find it useful to have a system that can easily test suppliers’ compounds. The need is there, and it’s time for suppliers to react to it, evolving offerings to provide the required education and substantiation.

I’d like to get your thoughts on the matter. Do you feel that the level of knowledge within the industry is up to scratch when it comes to specification? Let us know in the comments section.

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Resources/Downloads-2/

10 ESSENTIAL CONSIDERATIONS WHEN SPECIFYING

1. Evaluate supplier solutions based on whole life costs

You need to ensure you’re getting the best value over the full lifecycle of your products.  Buy cheap, buy twice, as they say.

2. Put emphasis on engineering capability

Evaluate the track record of your supplier closely. With ports and terminals becoming increasingly complex to accommodate the demands of modern vessels, it’s essential your supplier can demonstrate engineering experience and expertise that aligns with the needs of your project.

3. Consult shortlisted suppliers early in the project development

The earlier you consult suppliers, the more tailored your solution can be. Consult your suppliers at the conceptual design stage to ensure you get the bespoke package that really fits your requirements and guarantees optimum performance.

4. Insist on dealing with technical engineers as well as sales / bus dev personnel

If you don’t feel completely assured of your supplier’s technical expertise, determine their credentials by asking to deal with technical engineers. Your point of contact in the sales or business development team should be able to facilitate a discussion or find you the answers you need.

5. Inspect the suppliers facilities in person

If your supplier can’t give you access to their manufacturing facilities, alarm bells should be ringing.  Furthermore, you’re entitled to witness the testing procedures your products undergo. Get the reassurance you need to ensure you’re getting what you pay for.

6. Ask to witness testing

Your supplier should be able to offer you the opportunity to witness materials or full scale testing: ask for it.  Don’t let your supplier get off easy by just handing you the paperwork.

7. Explore suppliers’ track record

A robust track record should give you some confidence, but make sure your supplier has experience in your application.  A full track record should come as standard: expect it.

8. Demand samples and check certification of materials and processes

When specifying fenders, ask for a sample of the rubber compound that will be used in your project. Three key factors – velocity factor, temperature factor and longevity are affected by rubber grade and compound formulation. The properties of fenders vary dramatically depending on their composition, as such; rubber compound composition should be built into specifications in order to guarantee performance and lifecycle.

9. Get the training you and your people need

Your relationship with your supplier shouldn’t end at installation.  Demand maintenance and operational training to ensure you optimise performance in the field.

10. Ask about aftersales service

Full after sales support should be considered as part of your supplier’s offer. Not only should they be able to supply product training, spare parts and servicing should be available to you on demand, no matter where you are in the world.

 

RUBBER QUALITY: UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACT

The issue of rubber quality in fender systems is one that the market cannot continue to be complacent about.

A best writing paper typical fender system is constructed from both steel and rubber, and whilst the steel component will, rightly, undergo extensive testing to meet stringent standards, the importance of the fender’s rubber element is often overlooked.

In recent years, there has been a significant evolution in rubber manufacturing industries: we’ve seen the emergence of contract mixers, locations such as China and India becoming mainstream hubs, and the availability of a wider range of ingredients for rubber compounding.

These changes represent a break from tradition, and best practice in rubber compounding needs to keep pace.  The market must take the necessary steps to educate itself on this evolution and understand the effects these changes have on the performance and lifecycle of fenders.

We’ve recently launched a new whitepaper which delves into the issues of Velocity Factor (VF) and Temperature Factor (TF).  First introduced in PIANC’s “Guidelines for the design of fender systems, 2002” they should be applied to rubber fenders at the testing stage, to accurately ascertain performance in the field under varying compression times and temperatures.

Changing rubber compound ingredients have a direct effect on the characteristics of the fender and as such, VF and TF are greatly affected by the type of rubber used, be it natural or synthetic – and within that, virgin or recycled – and further still by the compound composition of the rubber.

VF and TF must be calculated and reported on a case by case basis.  Each is dependent on the make-up of the rubber compound, and as such, there is no “standard” factor that can be applied to calculate and report performance under varying velocities and temperatures. The degree of VF and TF applied will change depending on the rubber compound and, subsequently, from manufacturer to manufacturer.

PIANC’s recommendations for applying VF and TF are really only the beginning.  Suppliers need to make the appropriate investments in R&D to be able to underpin and substantiate their claims. Anecdotally, we’ve found that many actually copy factors which are not relevant to their products.

If suppliers aren’t able or willing to take the necessary steps to understand and be able to guarantee the quality of their products, then it’s essential that specifiers can to avoid throwing good money after bad on systems that are not fit for purpose.

To learn more, download the whitepaper. If you have any questions or comments, we’d love to hear from you in the comments section or via our LinkedIn group.

TRELLEBORG STATE-OF-THE-ART FENDERS WIN THREE NEW LNG DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTS

Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg Marine Systems

Having earlier in the year been awarded the contracts to supply docking and mooring equipment and monitoring software to all three liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects on Queensland’s Curtis Island, Australia; we are proud to announce that we at Trelleborg have now been chosen to supply the Queensland Curtis LNG, Gladstone LNG and Australia Pacific LNG projects with industry leading SCN Super Cone and ANP Arch Fender Systems.

Our solution was selected after we worked closely with contractor John Holland Group, thanks to our comprehensive range of solutions and ability to support regulatory guidelines and hazardous area standards.

Queensland Curtis LNG is the world’s first project to turn coal seam gas into LNG. It is currently one of Australia’s largest capital infrastructure projects and will see an investment of over $20billion from 2010 to 2014, when it will provide cleaner hydrocarbon energy for export.

We are delighted to have been awarded the three contracts on Curtis Island and are looking forward to again working closely with John Holland Group to execute these demanding projects.

The award of these contracts is testament to our unrivalled industry expertise and reputation as a world leader in the design and manufacture of advanced, high-performance solutions. The award of the Queensland Curtis Island projects also highlights our commitment to the fast moving LNG market and provides an ideal opportunity to showcase our full portfolio of industry leading solutions.

INTERPRETATION OF TEST RESULTS

Our rubber testing whitepaper “Fenders: why it’s not so black and white” highlights some interesting results from the comparison of the compositions of low cost and high quality fenders – results that clearly highlight dramatically different performance characteristics between the two.

The low cost fenders contained larger amounts of recycled rubber and filler, and were found to be heavier and denser than those that used virgin rubber.

Further chemical and physical analysis revealed some further important results, including:

  • Tensile strength and the value of elongation at break were found to be lower in the low cost fender than in the high quality fender, which was made with higher quantities of virgin rubber.

    Crucially, the low cost fender was not in compliance with the specification.

  • Rubber to filler ratio for the high quality fender was 1.23, for the low cost fender, just 0.88.
  • Overall, the low cost fender contained 28.45% less rubber than the high quality product, explaining the difference in the physical properties of the two and justifying the higher purchase price of the high quality fender.

It’s essential that decision makers are aware of the key performance differences and varying quality being sold as one and the same thing, when they procure fenders based on up front price alone.

These tests provide a reliable analytical method that can be made available to buyers so that they can assess the composition of recently procured fenders prior to delivery, simply by taking a small sample from the surface of the fender.

For more information, download the full rubber testing white paper here.

NEW FILM SHOWCASES THE IMPORTANCE OF AN “END-TO-END” SOLUTION

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg Marine Systems

Port and terminal owners and operators, consultants and contractors are constantly under pressure. Whilst continually adapting to accommodate a changing market – increasing vessel sizes and a broader variety of ships are placing new demands on facilities, not to mention the increasing prevalence of specialised projects. They must also find ways to reduce downtime, improve accountability and ensure that marine environments are safe and operationally efficient.

Our new film highlights just how vital it is, especially in these demanding environments, to use quality materials from reliable suppliers.  Calling on the strength of in-house design, engineering and manufacturing can help to ensure that specifiers procure products and solutions that demonstrate excellence beyond installation.

Aiming to raise awareness about how to get the best value and service throughout the supply chain, the film illustrates the entire fendering and docking and mooring production process, from conceptual design through to manufacture, quality control, testing and after sales care.

Check out the full End-to-End film here.

We’ll also be releasing this film in chapters over the coming weeks, so look out for the detail on “Conceptual Design”, “Docking and Mooring Manufacture”, Fender Manufacture” and finally, “Testing and Aftersales”.

TRELLEBORG LAUNCHES MINI GUIDE TO FOAM FENDERS

By Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems


Despite our history in rubber technology, we’re keen to raise awareness in the market of the viable alternative that foam can offer when specifying fender systems, as it’s essential that decision makers are aware of the options available to them, and find the right solutions for specific projects, on a case by case basis.

Although rubber fenders remain the go-to solution for many, who may be keen to stick with the status quo or specify rubber out of habit, decision makers need to know there is a choice to make, and that rubber might not be the right option for certain projects.

Of course, rubber fenders do remain the preferred solution for a number of applications, but the durability and versatility of lightweight foam fenders, as well as potential cost savings, lower maintenance requirements and simpler installation, make them a real contender in many project specifications where they might be overlooked.

Our new ‘Mini Guide to Foam Fenders’ features a new ‘Fender Selector’ tool, which aims to guide decision makers towards the right solution for their project.

To download Trelleborg’s new Foam Fenders Mini Guide, click here. http://www.takesthepressureoff.com/pdfs/Mini_Guide_to_Foam_Fenders.pdf

INCREASING PORT SAFETY HIGH ON THE AGENDA WITH NEW BOLLARD GUIDE

By Simon Wilson, Managing Director of Docking and Mooring, Trelleborg Marine Systems.


We’ve long stressed the importance of best practice, tailor-made solutions in providing specialist berthing and mooring systems.

It’s important that bespoke, integrated solutions are put in place to enable whole life cost savings and more importantly, ensure safe operations in demanding marine environments.

But, how do you specify a system that optimizes price and value for your particular solution?

Our new bollard guide, written for port operators, and contractors aims to help with just that. The new guide features all the latest comprehensive bollard data, factors to consider in the design process and specification and installation information.

The guide also underlines why different types of bollard are required for different applications and the significance of the differing performance characteristics.

Bollards are safety critical items and as such, product quality is paramount.  The importance of demanding the highest standards of certification is highlighted, with tips on what to look for in a quality documentation package.

To download your free copy of the Bollard Guide, visit http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/.