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Tag Archives: fenders

TRELLEBORG DISCUSSES ENHANCING MARITIME SAFETY AT PIANC VIETNAM SEMINAR

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation discussed the role of port and terminal equipment optimization in enhancing maritime safety at a two-day PIANC (Vietnam) seminar, held 14 July at Hotel Continental Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Co-organized by Trelleborg, Surbana Jurong and KASI Malaysia, the seminar discussed the latest in planning and design, marine risk assessment and vessel traffic management technology. This saw Trelleborg Regional Sales Manager (Marine Fenders, Asia) William Tan discuss the role of advanced marine fender systems in port, terminal and vessel safety.

Trelleborg Sales Director (Docking and Mooring, China and SEA) Ron Lee presented a case study on the Spirit of Tasmania II to emphasize the need for ports to adopt automated mooring to making mooring operations safer. Ron also discussed how port safety can be further enhanced by taking a holistic overview of operations, and the importance of implementing a complete port solution incorporating predictive environmental monitoring and an integrated Port System. Following the seminar (15 July), visitors also received a tour of the Saigon International Terminal Vietnam along the Cai Mep Thi Vai River, which uses Trelleborg Super Cone Fenders, SCK Cell Fenders and bollards.

To be invited to speak at the seminar is a real compliment, and testament to our industry expertise and reputation as a world leader in the design and manufacture of advanced navigation, piloting and port systems, and use of state-of-the-art software and smart technology to help pilots and ports optimize safety and efficiency in their day-to-day operations.

 

TALKING TECHNICALITIES: TRELLEBORG FENDER SEMINARS

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

I’m very pleased to announce Trelleborg is the platinum sponsor of PIANC Australia’s Technical Workshop on Fenders on June 15, 2017. My colleague, Mishra Kumar, our Global Technical Director will also present at the event, on the topic of ‘Ensuring Fender Performance through Physical and Material Testing Specification’.

We’ve long supported the work of PIANC and our contribution to the forthcoming technical seminar is just the latest in a long history of collaborative work. We look forward to joining peers from other leading companies at the event, to share our latest ideas and best practice.

We will also be hosting two of our own technical seminars in Australia, in Perth on the 12th June, and one in Brisbane on the 14th June. These seminars will see Trelleborg experts discuss rubber fender design, technology and testing, pneumatic fender design and application, as well as foam fender design and application.

We’re also the Platinum Sponsor of PIANC’s Annual General Assembly (AGA) in Cairns, Australia, which takes place from 17 – 20 June.

To register for either of the Trelleborg seminars, please visit: https://goo.gl/Zo21AK

For further details on PIANC Australia’s Technical Workshop on fenders, go to: http://aga2017.com.au/btv/

 

 

FENDER MAINTENANCE LACKING, LEADING TO DISPROPORTIONATE FAILURE RATES

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Our fifth annual Barometer Report, which discusses the issues impacting ports and terminals around the globe, has revealed that over 60% of the port owners, operators, consultants and contractors surveyed have experienced unscheduled downtime due to fender damage. This is a huge increase compared to the last report in 2014, when only 20% cited it as a contributing factor.

At the same time, 25% of those surveyed expect fender systems to have a life expectancy of at least ten years. This is a reasonable expectation, but not when taking in to consideration that respondents are not placing enough importance on regular inspections and maintenance. This is because only 36% carry out maintenance annually, while over 60% of those surveyed said that they, or their clients only carried out inspections and maintenance every two to ten years, far below the recommended frequency of every 12 months.

It’s clear there’s still work to be done to ensure fender maintenance is given the importance it deserves. However, this is only half the story – before maintenance becomes an issue, fenders must be manufactured correctly, using the best design and the right materials and go through stringent testing to make absolutely sure these mission critical components protect port infrastructure over a long and demanding service life, minimizing maintenance requirements.

Fender systems can have very low failure rates and minimal inspection requirements. However, to do so they need to be specified correctly and manufactured using the right materials. For example, the modulus of the rubber compound – the relationship between stress and strain in a cured rubber sample – is one of the determining factor of a fender’s performance, and highly impacted by the dispersion of carbon black filler in the rubber. The level of dispersion, in turn, is dependent on the mixing process, the quality of which is determined by the machinery used in the production of the rubber compound.

After manufacture, fenders must be subjected to rigorous materials and full-scale testing. To ensure they consistently meet working demands and environmental conditions over their lifetime, they need to be maintained correctly. Given the lack of regular inspections and maintenance, it’s unsurprising that 50% of port owners are saying they have had to upgrade their fender systems within the last ten years.

To download the Barometer Report 5, visit: http://ow.ly/VmYR3

TRELLEBORG DISCUSSES PORT PERFORMANCE AT RUBBERCON 2015

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation was invited to speak at the leading event in the international rubber calendar, RubberCon 2015, in early March, which was held at Hotel ITC Grand Chola in Chennai, India.

Organized by the Indian Rubber Institute (IRI), Rubbercon is the official bi-annual conference from the International Rubber Conference Organization (IRCO). With the theme ‘Shaping the Future through Innovative Technology’, Rubbercon 2015 brought together over 600 attendees to discuss the latest trends and developments in the rubber and allied industries.

At the seminar, Trelleborg technical expert, Mishra Kumar, discussed how a superior rubber formulation – one which uses natural rubber and reinforcing fillers – can be degraded if it is subjected to an inferior mixing process, ultimately producing a low performance compound and a low performance fender.

In addition, Mishra also discussed mixing and compound modulus as an effective and robust measure of fender performance.

You can learn more about the topics covered in our recent “Assuring fender Performance” webinar.

TRELLEBORG HOSTS PORT PERFORMANCE SEMINAR IN GREECE

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Trelleborg’s marine systems operation hosted an exclusive one-day seminar for port authorities and consultants in partnership with the company’s exclusive agent for Greece, Seamark Marine on 1st March at the Metropolitan Chandris Hotel in Athens, Greece.

The free seminar saw experts at Trelleborg discuss a range of key industry issues including marine fender selection, infrastructure regulation, the latest in docking and mooring technology, and floating fender and buoy design. In addition, the importance of rubber compound composition in the whole-life performance of fender systems was also on the agenda.

The seminar provided the ideal platform for us to connect with port authorities and consultants to discuss the importance of taking a smarter approach to port and terminal equipment optimization through the specification of smart, engineered solutions for port approach, berthing, docking and mooring. This will enable ports and terminals to reap the rewards of better informed real-time and strategic decision making, both onshore and on board the vessel.

Following on from the seminar in Athens we will host further one-day events across Europe, which we’ll be revealing more information about in due course.

TRELLEBORG HOSTS TECHNICAL SEMINAR FOR THE HONG KONG INSTITUTE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING COUNCIL

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

On 25th of February, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation hosted a technical seminar for the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Training Council’s Department of Construction at our factory in Singapore.

Attended by lecturers from the largest vocational and professional education and training provider in Hong Kong, the seminar saw experts at Trelleborg discuss the latest in integrated berthing and mooring systems for ports and terminals, as well as the life cycle and design parameters of marine fenders.

Following the seminar, attendees were given a full factory tour which included the facility’s rubber lab. This provided visitors with the opportunity to see the latest developments in rubber technology first hand and the impact these technical advances have on performance and lifecycle.

It was great to see the enthusiasm of the group and we are delighted that such an esteemed educational institution is to incorporate key insights from the seminar in its training curriculum to equip civil engineering and construction students with integrated berthing and mooring systems best practice knowledge.

This is testament to Trelleborg’s unrivalled reputation and industry expertise. It was a pleasure to host the visit, and we very much look forward to the next one.

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF MIXING, MANUFACTURING AND MODULUS

We’re pleased to announce that, last week, we launched a brand new whitepaper and webinar which aim to raise awareness of the importance of ingredient selection, mixing and the manufacturing process in marine fenders.

Building on our previous research into ingredient selection and its impact on fender performance, the new materials highlight that compound modulus – the relationship between stress and strain in a cured rubber sample – is a far more effective and robust measure of fender performance than the traditional ‘hardness’, which is currently used in the industry.

The new research has proven beyond doubt the need for a new measure of fender performance, as ‘hardness’ is unreliable and can be easily falsified. As such, we suggest that the industry moves towards measuring the modulus of rubber compounds, to ensure the characteristics of the fender are truly understood.

Compound modulus is the determining factor of a fender’s performance, and highly impacted by the dispersion of filler in the rubber.  This dispersion, in turn, is dependent on the mixing process, the quality of which is determined by the machinery used.

We have discovered that even a superior rubber formulation – one which uses natural rubber and reinforcing fillers – can be degraded if it is subjected to an inferior mixing process, ultimately producing a low performance compound and a low performance fender.

The uniformity of filler dispersion within the rubber is critical: poor dispersion can lead to damaging effects such as reduced service life, poor performance, poor appearance and even poor product uniformity.

Our new whitepaper discusses the importance of the machinery used to mix the ingredients: there are a number of related parameters that affect filler dispersion in the final mix, including ram pressure, rotor speed and design, coolant temperature and sequence.

The new whitepaper explores which machinery options are most effective and give manufacturers the most control over these critical factors.

The webinar goes into more detail on the importance of measuring modulus, including an examination of filler dispersion in compounds produced by different mixing machines.

We’d love you to read the whitepaper, and watch the webinar – and let us know what you think of the new research in the comments.

To download the whitepaper, “Rubber Fenders: Mixing it Up”, please click here.

To watch the webinar, “Assuring fender Performance”, please click here.

EXAMINING THE IMPACT OF MEGA SHIPS

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)’s International Transport Forum recently released ‘The Impact of Mega Ships’, a new report investigating the impact of larger container ships on infrastructure, equipment and port traffic.

The report, which looks at the pros and cons of the current ‘mega’ container ships, put forward that 24,000 TEU vessels, which could be in service as soon as 2020, will have a major impact on main trade lines, potentially raising transport costs and hindering the competitiveness of ports overall.

We submitted information to the report with regards to the impact that ever increasing vessel sizes are having on port infrastructure, and in particular fenders and docking and mooring equipment such as bollards and hooks.

It’s a timely report. Our latest Barometer Report survey, the fifth that we have conducted, has found that ports are still struggling to keep up with the demands of increasing vessel sizes, especially in terms of onwards logistics.

This is another problem highlighted by the OECD report: although increasing vessel sizes have delivered cost savings in the past, these are decreasing with size, and size-related ‘fixes’ to port and hinterland infrastructure could be substantial.

A more complex challenge

Whilst mega ships bring these increased demands with them, one of the biggest challenges we see is actually designing berths to accommodate the large vessels of the future, whilst ensuring that they are still able to accommodate smaller vessels in the short term.

For our part, this requires fender design that can accommodate a wide range of operating parameters.  Designing a fender system that will perform successfully with kinds of vessel means the rubber compound must be fine-tuned to absorb the required energy, no matter the size of the ship. The properties of the rubber element must be hard enough to withstand the high loads from larger vessels, yet soft enough to accept the loads from smaller vessels.

Bigger ships doesn’t necessarily equal bigger fenders

The new generation of large container vessels uses several fenders at once, which limits the need for increased fender sizes; the extra amount of energy that needs to be absorbed is simply absorbed via more fenders. However, designing for multiple fender contact is still not straightforward for new mega vessels. The considerable bow flare of these ships, designed to accommodate as many containers as possible, mean that even a small berthing angle can lead to contact between the ship and the quay wall equipment.

Taking the pressure off

The rubber component of the fender system can be developed in other ways too, and can even reduce the impact on other port equipment in accommodating mega ships. For example, by designing fender systems with a smaller profile – but more efficient performance characteristics – ports can avoid the often costly process of extending or replacing cranes.

As we see it, ever growing vessel sizes certainly bring with them a whole host of new considerations for ports, not least upgrading infrastructure to allow them to berth. With onwards logistics considerations bringing about their own problems, there needs to be more collaboration and communication across the whole supply chain.

Working with and across suppliers, through an iterative process, from design, is critical to ensuring the port itself benefits from the increased throughput of increased vessel sizes, rather than being hamstrung by it.

TRELLEBORG TO SHOWCASE NAVIGATION BUOYS AT SEAWORK 2015 INTERNATIONAL

Ashley Tasker, Global Business Development Manager for Marine Products at Trelleborg Marine Systems

I am delighted to reveal that we will showcase our innovative range of IALA compliant modular navigation buoys at Seawork 2015 International, the largest and fastest growing international commercial marine and workboat exhibition and conference held in a European working port environment (16th to 18th June).

Our unique, comprehensive range of navigation buoys provides a solution to fit all demanding requirements – in addition to our standard range, we are able to manufacture to specification where required. The modular system provides an easily transported option to cut down turnaround time and enable fast installation, as they can be shipped in sections and assembled on site.

Manufactured from impact resistant, colour-fast, UV stable materials and comprising of sectional hull pieces filled with marine grade, water-resistant foam, Trelleborg’s range of IALA compliant modular navigation buoys is built around a hot dipped galvanised steel core. Available as standard in diameters ranging from 1.25 to 3.6 meters, Trelleborg will also manufacture precisely to specification where required.

We will also be taking the opportunity to showcase our range of Foam / Elastomer constructed mooring buoys. Thanks to their low maintenance, self-fendering resilient foam bodies and their ease of handling and repair whilst offshore, these are rapidly replacing traditional steel mooring buoys.

Our booth will also feature our pneumatic and foam fenders. As an ideal ship protection medium for load sensitive structures such as LNG vessels and ocean platforms, our range of pneumatic fenders feature high energy absorption with low reaction force. While our foam fenders are super tough due to a unique manufacturing process and have high energy absorption for their reactive load.

If you’re heading to Seawork 2015 and want to find out more, come and see us at booth number A187.

Alternatively, visit: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/

TRELLEBORG DEMONSTRATES VALUE OF SMART SPECIFICATION

Demonstrating a commitment to quality and resisting the temptation to do business with low cost suppliers, Davao International Container Terminal, Inc. (DICT) located in Panabo City, Davao Del Norte, has purchased state-of-the-art Super Cone fenders and Tee Head bollards.

Berths 1 and 2 at the Breakbulk Terminal, which is located on the southeastern coast of the Philippines, are old concrete structures that required the installation of a superior fender system as part of upgrade works.

DICT had recently discovered that another port in Davao had upgraded their berth using low quality fender systems and they had cracked within just months of installation, with the frontal frames also beginning to corrode too. Extensive testing of the performance of the terminal’s previous fenders revealed that these were unable to guarantee the load bearing requirements of the reefer vessels currently visiting the terminal.

DICT quickly embarked on a project to replace its existing equipment with high quality, best-in-class solutions. We provided an end-to-end approach, through consultation on fendering, design along with engineering, manufacturing, testing, commissioning and installation works as well as after-sales and maintenance.

DICT turned to Trelleborg to supply 20 SCN900 fender systems to enable the berthing of vessels up to 30,000 DWT at Berths 1 and 2. As part of the terminal’s wider plans for expansion, DICT also opted for 22 SCN1100 E2.9 fender systems and 12 100T Tea Head bollards allowing for the berthing of the latest ultra-large container vessels up to 60,000 DWT at its newly constructed Berth 3.

The issue of quality in marine fenders is one that we have been discussing for some time. We have long called for more strategic specification for mission critical equipment and it’s great to see this is now translating across the market.

Like more and more customers, Davao International Container Terminal recognises the importance of quality. They realise that taking the strategic approach will mean savings over the life of the fender system and the berth as a whole, whilst reducing the risk of damage to both vessels and the terminal’s infrastructure itself.

I will leave you with a few words from Mr. Jesse G. Chiongson, Senior Vice President and General Manager of DICT, who said: “The performance of DICT’s previous fender systems significantly affected the operation of the terminal and ran the risk of harming its reputation as the leading port terminal in Mindanao. Therefore we had no hesitation in working closely with Trelleborg to define an ideal solution which would not only stand the test of time but guarantee the demanding load-bearing requirements of the vessels berthing at the terminal. Trelleborg’s unrivalled reputation and technical qualification meant the company was a natural choice to supply the project.”