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Tag Archives: fender systems

TRELLEBORG TO LAUNCH PORT INFRASTRUCTURE AND INNOVATION SEMINAR SERIES

Marco Gaal, Regional Director at Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

Here at Trelleborg, we’re constantly looking for ways to develop our offering to meet new market needs. To do so, we try to ensure that we’re communicating with the market as much as possible to gain valuable insights and feedback on our offering. 

As such, we will be hosting two exclusive one-day seminars featuring the themes of port infrastructure and innovation. Held on 24th March at the Mercure Hotel, Den Haag Leidschendam in Holland, and on 26th March at the Grand Connaught Rooms in London, the free seminars will see myself and a number of colleagues, as well as a number of guest speakers from across the industry, discuss a range of key industry issues, including the optimization of whole-life performance in fender systems. The seminars will provide attendees with valuable insights into marine fender design and selection best practice, and the latest docking and mooring innovations to improve efficiency and improve performance.

The new series of seminars will allow us to talk in-depth with contractors and consultants so we can ensure we’re up to date with the latest market developments and can evolve our offering to meet them.

Ultimately, it’s vital that suppliers meet the needs of their clients by offering support in the areas that customers need it most, be that maintenance, training or other operational requirements across the entire product lifecycle. In our new series of seminars, we’re striving to ensure we do exactly that.

For more information about the conference, or if you’d like to register your attendance at either seminar, visit: http://trelleborg.tecs1.com/Consultant

 

UNSCHEDULED DOWNTIME IS STILL HOLDING BACK THE PORT INDUSTRY

Our latest Barometer Report has revealed that unscheduled downtime is still a problem in the port industry.

We found that 74% of port owners and operators are still suffering unscheduled downtime. Fender damage was the most frequently cited cause, with 20% of owners and operators having suffered downtime due to damage to their systems.

The high incidence of fender damage and the subsequent downtime may be due to a lack of awareness on how to specify a truly quality system, something which really needs to be improved upon. 61% of the consultants and contractors we surveyed claim that their clients are concerned about upfront purchase costs, which could explain the poorly-performing solutions.

To me, the results of the survey suggest that fender system performance and quality is a serious issue. Two-thirds of port owners and operators say that they have upgraded their fender systems in the last five years – despite the fact that fender systems have an intended design life of 25 years.

The many upgrades which have taken place in recent years could be indicative of poor quality solutions which have to be constantly upgraded, with clients’ focus on cost-cutting a potential cause.

Levels of unscheduled downtime have decreased over time, which is a positive step, but any amount of downtime is costly in terms of lost revenue and damaged reputation. Concern about upfront costs is understandable, but in the long term, poor solutions can result in even bigger costs. Contractors and consultants should educate themselves on how to specify quality to steer clients away from cost-cutting upfront and towards investing in quality solutions that will perform well over a long design life.

To view the full results of the latest Barometer Report, visit the Trelleborg Marine Systems website.

SOUTHAMPTON CONTAINER TERMINAL TURNS TO TRELLEBORG TO ENABLE BERTHING OF LARGER VESSELS

We were recently awarded the contract to supply over 70 Unit Element fender systems to DP World, Southampton, which will berth the latest ultra-large container ships.

I believe that our consistency in performance and engineering expertise has supported our relationship with the terminal.  We’ve worked together for a while now, and this contract brings total amount of fenders supplied to over 110.

Brin Humphreys, head of Engineering at DP World Southampton, said: “Due to the proven performance of the systems supplied by Trelleborg, we had no hesitation in turning to them once again. It was clear they had the capabilities to successfully deliver our expectations and requirements again.”

We have worked closely with DP World Southampton for over 10 years, first installing our Unit Element fenders in 1996 on SCT 1 Berth.

When refurbishment began on SCT berths 2, 3 and 4, in 2011, DP World chose us to keep the solution in line with SCT 1. We are delighted that we yet again had the opportunity to work with DP World Southampton using our unique solutions for such an important project.

On completion of the current project, Southampton will offer 1.87 kilometres of deep water quay, with up to 16 meters depth alongside. In addition, the 16 quayside gantry cranes with super post panamax capacity will allow for berthing of vessels over 400 meters in length.

It is vital that infrastructure keeps up with the ever increasing size of vessels and therefore we are delighted to be designing, manufacturing and installing our bespoke fender systems for a facility that places such importance on proactively keeping up with demand.

 

 

JEBEL ALI PORT RECOGNISES IMPORTANCE OF RUBBER SPECIFICATION

We are proud to announce the introduction of our rubber quality standards at the world’s largest man-made harbor – The Jebel Ali Port in Dubai. We have been working on the Quay Four refurbishment project with DP world since 2011, and have now completed installation with 60 super cone SCN 1300 fenders to project berths 18 and 19.

Super Cone fenders provide optimal performance and efficiency. The unique design makes them an excellent choice in terms of stability, strength and also resistance to over-compression.

The addition of analytical tests to verify the quality of rubber used in the fenders has ensured us to really reassure the port that the high-performance required for this project will be met.

As the biggest port in the Middle East and a supplier to the global market, we are delighted that DP world has shown commitment to superior solutions by building rubber quality standards in to their fender specifications.

Thanks to our entirely in-house approach, we could even personalise the solution for DP World by including the DP World Logo on the UHMW PE face pads of the fenders.

I will leave you with a few words from Hesham Abdulla, Container Terminal 1 director of DP world, who said: “Trelleborg was able to offer technical support across all parts of the system, from ensuring the rubber element would precisely meet specification, to chains and accessories. Their support and local presence meant that they were a natural choice to supply the project and thanks to their in-house manufacturing capabilities we could even have the solution personalised.”

PORTS CLAIM PIANC CERTIFICATION KEY TO COMPLIANCE AND REGULATION

The results of our latest Barometer Report show that the majority (65%) of port owners, operators and contractors request and check PIANC certification to ensure that marine fenders are sold as described.

Although it’s reassuring to see that the majority of respondents do request certification, it’s important that owners and operators understand exactly what to look for. PIANC is undoubtedly an important standard bearer for quality and performance, but it doesn’t have the legal mandate to enforce standards across the industry.

At present, it’s too easy to gain PIANC certification, with some of the more unscrupulous traders using this to their advantage by applying certification to entire product lines or factories, rather than to specific product batches and compound formulations.

In comparison to last year’s report, which revealed that just under 80% of respondents were struggling to get to grips with unscheduled downtime, this year’s Barometer reveals that, alarmingly, over 90% are now suffering, which suggests to me that the emphasis placed on checking certification in theory, is not necessarily translating to best practice.

It’s therefore imperative that equipment specifiers, for mission critical equipment such as fenders, begin to take necessary steps to ensure that the products they are buying are truly “as described”.

I’d like to get your thoughts on the matter. How much importance do you put by third party certification and design approvals when procuring mission critical equipment? Let us know in the comments section.

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Home/

RUBBER QUALITY: UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACT

The issue of rubber quality in fender systems is one that the market cannot continue to be complacent about.

A best writing paper typical fender system is constructed from both steel and rubber, and whilst the steel component will, rightly, undergo extensive testing to meet stringent standards, the importance of the fender’s rubber element is often overlooked.

In recent years, there has been a significant evolution in rubber manufacturing industries: we’ve seen the emergence of contract mixers, locations such as China and India becoming mainstream hubs, and the availability of a wider range of ingredients for rubber compounding.

These changes represent a break from tradition, and best practice in rubber compounding needs to keep pace.  The market must take the necessary steps to educate itself on this evolution and understand the effects these changes have on the performance and lifecycle of fenders.

We’ve recently launched a new whitepaper which delves into the issues of Velocity Factor (VF) and Temperature Factor (TF).  First introduced in PIANC’s “Guidelines for the design of fender systems, 2002” they should be applied to rubber fenders at the testing stage, to accurately ascertain performance in the field under varying compression times and temperatures.

Changing rubber compound ingredients have a direct effect on the characteristics of the fender and as such, VF and TF are greatly affected by the type of rubber used, be it natural or synthetic – and within that, virgin or recycled – and further still by the compound composition of the rubber.

VF and TF must be calculated and reported on a case by case basis.  Each is dependent on the make-up of the rubber compound, and as such, there is no “standard” factor that can be applied to calculate and report performance under varying velocities and temperatures. The degree of VF and TF applied will change depending on the rubber compound and, subsequently, from manufacturer to manufacturer.

PIANC’s recommendations for applying VF and TF are really only the beginning.  Suppliers need to make the appropriate investments in R&D to be able to underpin and substantiate their claims. Anecdotally, we’ve found that many actually copy factors which are not relevant to their products.

If suppliers aren’t able or willing to take the necessary steps to understand and be able to guarantee the quality of their products, then it’s essential that specifiers can to avoid throwing good money after bad on systems that are not fit for purpose.

To learn more, download the whitepaper. If you have any questions or comments, we’d love to hear from you in the comments section or via our LinkedIn group.

TRELLEBORG STATE-OF-THE-ART FENDERS WIN THREE NEW LNG DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTS

Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg Marine Systems

Having earlier in the year been awarded the contracts to supply docking and mooring equipment and monitoring software to all three liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects on Queensland’s Curtis Island, Australia; we are proud to announce that we at Trelleborg have now been chosen to supply the Queensland Curtis LNG, Gladstone LNG and Australia Pacific LNG projects with industry leading SCN Super Cone and ANP Arch Fender Systems.

Our solution was selected after we worked closely with contractor John Holland Group, thanks to our comprehensive range of solutions and ability to support regulatory guidelines and hazardous area standards.

Queensland Curtis LNG is the world’s first project to turn coal seam gas into LNG. It is currently one of Australia’s largest capital infrastructure projects and will see an investment of over $20billion from 2010 to 2014, when it will provide cleaner hydrocarbon energy for export.

We are delighted to have been awarded the three contracts on Curtis Island and are looking forward to again working closely with John Holland Group to execute these demanding projects.

The award of these contracts is testament to our unrivalled industry expertise and reputation as a world leader in the design and manufacture of advanced, high-performance solutions. The award of the Queensland Curtis Island projects also highlights our commitment to the fast moving LNG market and provides an ideal opportunity to showcase our full portfolio of industry leading solutions.

TACKLING OPERATIONAL COSTS WITH THE RIGHT TECHNOLOGY

Jean-Francois Garcia, General Manager – Sales France / Africa at Trelleborg Marine Systems

Towards the end of March, I attended the 11th Intermodal Africa North 2013 in Dakar, Senegal. Intermodal Africa North 2013 is the largest annual Containerised Ports, Shipping Transport Logistics Exhibition and Conference on the African continent and so provided an ideal platform for us to share our comprehensive range of equipment, ideas and best practice with those in attendance.

After investing heavily in strengthening our global reach with the addition of a local ‘feet on the ground’ presence in the region towards the end of last year, it was essential we made the most of what is undoubtedly one of the largest events of its kind within the EMEA Corridor.

At Intermodal Africa North 2013 we took the opportunity to exhibit a number of our industry leading products including our new easy slide in, slide out solution for PE Pad replacement which promises to not only reduce maintenance downtime from days to just hours, but also lowers the total cost of ownership.

I also took to the stage to discuss the significance of applying the right technology to successfully reduce operational costs, including the importance of specifying high quality rubber fenders to ensure longer lifetime and the significance of fender maintenance.

Last year, having developed new analytical and chemical tests to investigate the difference between high quality and low cost fenders, we found some rather damning differences between two fenders which claimed to be designed to the same specification. Ultimately, decision makers need to open their eyes to the varying quality on offer when buying on the basis of short term cost savings and realise that they’re not only causing unprecedented levels of downtime, but also putting ports at risk.

INTERPRETATION OF TEST RESULTS

Our rubber testing whitepaper “Fenders: why it’s not so black and white” highlights some interesting results from the comparison of the compositions of low cost and high quality fenders – results that clearly highlight dramatically different performance characteristics between the two.

The low cost fenders contained larger amounts of recycled rubber and filler, and were found to be heavier and denser than those that used virgin rubber.

Further chemical and physical analysis revealed some further important results, including:

  • Tensile strength and the value of elongation at break were found to be lower in the low cost fender than in the high quality fender, which was made with higher quantities of virgin rubber.

    Crucially, the low cost fender was not in compliance with the specification.

  • Rubber to filler ratio for the high quality fender was 1.23, for the low cost fender, just 0.88.
  • Overall, the low cost fender contained 28.45% less rubber than the high quality product, explaining the difference in the physical properties of the two and justifying the higher purchase price of the high quality fender.

It’s essential that decision makers are aware of the key performance differences and varying quality being sold as one and the same thing, when they procure fenders based on up front price alone.

These tests provide a reliable analytical method that can be made available to buyers so that they can assess the composition of recently procured fenders prior to delivery, simply by taking a small sample from the surface of the fender.

For more information, download the full rubber testing white paper here.

INCREASING PORT SAFETY HIGH ON THE AGENDA WITH NEW BOLLARD GUIDE

By Simon Wilson, Managing Director of Docking and Mooring, Trelleborg Marine Systems.


We’ve long stressed the importance of best practice, tailor-made solutions in providing specialist berthing and mooring systems.

It’s important that bespoke, integrated solutions are put in place to enable whole life cost savings and more importantly, ensure safe operations in demanding marine environments.

But, how do you specify a system that optimizes price and value for your particular solution?

Our new bollard guide, written for port operators, and contractors aims to help with just that. The new guide features all the latest comprehensive bollard data, factors to consider in the design process and specification and installation information.

The guide also underlines why different types of bollard are required for different applications and the significance of the differing performance characteristics.

Bollards are safety critical items and as such, product quality is paramount.  The importance of demanding the highest standards of certification is highlighted, with tips on what to look for in a quality documentation package.

To download your free copy of the Bollard Guide, visit http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/.