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Tag Archives: docking

TRELLEBORG TAKES TO PREVENTION FIRST 2014 TO DISCUSS END-TO-END SERVICE OFFERING

October’s “Prevention First: An Onshore and Offshore Pollution Prevention Symposium & Technology Exhibition”, provided the ideal platform to discuss the importance of technical and aftersales support, and the service Trelleborg Marine Systems offers.

Here at Trelleborg, we offer a complete range of fendering, docking and mooring solutions, as well as a one-stop-shop for technical, operational and maintenance support.  Our most recent Barometer Report revealed a huge gap in the maintenance requirements of port owners and operators, and the support that suppliers are able to provide. So it was great to use the exhibition as a platform to connect with stakeholders to discuss where suppliers fall short and what more we can do to give them the support they need.

Ultimately, successful projects engage suppliers from the earliest possible stages, to get input and guidance on what will be the most appropriate solution on a case-by-case basis. That’s why we provide stakeholders with support from the earliest design stages to aftersales support. In particular, it was great to discuss our program for the North American market, and its development in accordance with OCIMF, SIGTTO and PIANC guidelines.

We also had a comprehensive team of sales and technical experts on stand to take visitors through the role Trelleborg played in the first phase of implementation of the Marine Oil Terminal Engineering and Maintenance Standards (MOTEMS). The standards apply to all existing and new marine oil terminals in California, and include criteria for inspection, structural analysis and design including mooring and berthing requirements.

The Prevention First exhibition is organised by the California State Lands Commission (CSLC), which sets the requirements for marine jetties throughout California.

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Home/

 

 

 

TRELLEBORG COMMIT TO GLOBAL REACH WITH LOCAL PRESENCE

By Richard Hepworth, President of Trelleborg Marine Systems


With a global client base, we place great emphasis on the need to consistently review how we best service all regions. As such, as part of our ongoing commitment to better serve our customers through local presence, we are proud to announce that we are expanding our docking and mooring service, making it easier for all our customers to reach us, whenever they need to.

Whilst previously we sold our docking and mooring product portfolio out of our Manufacturing Centre of Excellence facility in Melbourne, we understand that this wasn’t ideal for those of our customers based in other locations around the world.

Therefore to ensure our customers, whether based in Asia, Oceania, South America, China, Japan, IMEA, Europe or America, have access to the same high quality support, from conceptual design through to aftersales care for docking and mooring equipment, our marine systems operation is now giving customers access to a dedicated docking and mooring representative who can speak the local language and work in the local time zone.

For more information, visit the website.

 

NEW WEBINAR HIGHLIGHTING COMPLEX SYSTEMS INTEGRATION REQUIREMENTS IN FSRUS

Following on from our new whitepaper, “Avoid the Disconnect”, we have also launched a new on-demand webinar for the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) sector, which discusses the increasing prevalence of Floating Storage and Regasification Units (FSRUs), the complexity these projects bring about in docking and mooring systems integration, and the importance of considering the jetty, FSRU and LNGC holistically.

The new webinar, “A Comprehensive Approach to FLNG Docking and Mooring Systems”, also examines the differing regulations on design requirements between jetty, FSRU and LNG Carrier, as well as highlighting the importance of centralised monitoring and communications systems, to streamline and align information sharing between all three entities.

In this new webinar, our technical expert will also talk you through the pitfalls of considering docking and mooring systems elements for FSRU projects in isolation and the impact of the mooring system arrangement on systems integration.

To view the new webinar, visit the TrelleborgMarine YouTube channel now: http://ow.ly/pJ8V6

FSRUS – CLASS AND REGULATIONS

Following on from last week’s blog, the differing regulations on design requirements between jetty, FSRU and LNG carrier provide more food for thought. Marine Classification Societies focus on the FSRU cheap cialis online and treat an FSRU project as a shipbuilding activity, providing design review and approval, oversight during construction and undertake hull and machinery surveys to assure compliance, providing vessels are fit for purpose as ships.

However, although these organisations have specific requirements from a material and design standpoint for the mooring system hardware, Class doesn’t comment on fitness for purpose in terms of the vessels’ ultimate role in an FSRU project. Mainly, compliance is assessed from the standpoint of material selection, acceptable stress levels and a “fail safe” design philosophy.

On the other hand, regulations around the onshore, or jetty, side of the project are more operationally focused, with review from local or national authorities and organisations such as OCIMF and SIGTTO. However, these focus on guidelines for operational best practice and the recommendations they make for onshore considerations do not take into account the needs of the shipbuilder.

With these differing regulation requirements in mind, it’s clear a comprehensive approach to the design and functionality of the system, from the FEED stage, is required.

For more information, download our new whitepaper “Avoid the Disconnect”: http://ow.ly/pJ3IA

 

TACKLING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION REQUIREMENTS IN FSRUS HEAD ON

Avoid the Disconnect: a new whitepaper for the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) sector

The use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is now a widespread, commercial reality, as the demand for energy continues to rise. To maximise the opportunities of this major fuel source, FLNG projects are increasingly being considered as the optimal project configuration.

Floating Storage and Regasification Units (FSRUs) represent the majority of FLNG projects currently being executed – or in the pre-FEED stage, as they provide an attractive “fast track” solution for small markets and emerging economies.

FSRU projects bring the need to combine elements of conventional jetty docking and mooring, as well as offshore ship-to-ship mooring systems. Additionally, with more than two entities required to interface with each other, systems integration becomes more complex.

There isn’t a “generic” docking, mooring and fendering package that can be applied to FSRUs and its essential that the requirements of all three entities are considered holistically in order to ensure the optimum solution for all three elements, and minimise operational difficulties down the line.

For more information, download our new whitepaper “Avoid the Disconnect”, which further discusses the issues surrounding system integration requirements in docking, mooring and transfer for the FLNG market: http://ow.ly/pJ3IA

 

BECOMING LNG LEADERS

The use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is now a widespread, commercial reality, as the demand for energy continues to rise. It’s predicted that by 2030, global energy demand will be about 35% higher than it was in 2005.

Natural gas is largely accepted to be the fastest-growing major fuel source, thanks to attributes such as it being cleaner, reliable and plentiful.  Now that it can be transported in the form of LNG, it’s become a truly viable, global resource.

In fact, the question has now become: “how can we get more LNG? Faster and cheaper?” this is clear from the proliferation of acronyms that weren’t even coined as recently as five years ago, such as, FSRUs, FLNG and LNGCs.  All of which have one thing in common, apart from the obvious LNG production and transportation element!

That is the safety factor.  LNG is simply natural gas compressed to 1/600th of the volume, but hazards of the gas in its liquid form include flammability and freezing.  It’s essential that solutions are delivered on the merits of each project, to ensure that the safety of personnel and infrastructure remains paramount.

To achieve efficient operation and maximise safety, docking and mooring solutions on the terminals or carriers that LNG is transferred between should be seamlessly integrated and developed mutually inclusively.

I think a step towards this is to bring as much of the project as possible into one holistic and aligned “package”, with one third party having oversight of a suite of products to be supplied, it’s easier to identify synergies and align the various components.

We’ve recently acquired Sea Systems Technology Ltd. (SeaTechnik) – the global market-leader in the design and manufacture of systems for safeguarding the transfer of LNG between LNG carriers and shore terminals.

In addition to developing, manufacturing and supporting systems for the safe handling of LNG, SeaTechnik has a growing share of products and solutions that monitor and can actively manage in the operating performance of ships, the aim of which is to significantly reduce both emissions and fuel costs.

Given the on-going rise in demand for LNG, we see the sector as an attractive growth area and we’re keen to be able to offer our customers a “one-stop-shop” when it comes to docking, mooring and berthing equipment for LNG projects.  This acquisition will allow us to build on our existing expertise and capabilities. SeaTechnik’s portfolio already has similar design requirements to ours and we already work together closely, so the acquisition provides natural synergies and is a logical step to take.

SeaTechnik employees 45 people globally.  Design, manufacture and assembly is based in a UK facility, outside of Chester in the North West, with local sales support, installation and commissioning work and specialist manufacturing carried out in Korea and Singapore.

I look forward to working closely with our new colleagues and would like to take the opportunity to personally welcome them to the team.

To learn more about SeaTechnik, visit the website here http://www.seatechnik.com/

INCREASING PORT SAFETY HIGH ON THE AGENDA WITH NEW BOLLARD GUIDE

By Simon Wilson, Managing Director of Docking and Mooring, Trelleborg Marine Systems.


We’ve long stressed the importance of best practice, tailor-made solutions in providing specialist berthing and mooring systems.

It’s important that bespoke, integrated solutions are put in place to enable whole life cost savings and more importantly, ensure safe operations in demanding marine environments.

But, how do you specify a system that optimizes price and value for your particular solution?

Our new bollard guide, written for port operators, and contractors aims to help with just that. The new guide features all the latest comprehensive bollard data, factors to consider in the design process and specification and installation information.

The guide also underlines why different types of bollard are required for different applications and the significance of the differing performance characteristics.

Bollards are safety critical items and as such, product quality is paramount.  The importance of demanding the highest standards of certification is highlighted, with tips on what to look for in a quality documentation package.

To download your free copy of the Bollard Guide, visit http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/.

BESPOKE SOLUTIONS WIN US A NEW DEEP SEA CONTAINER PORT CONTRACT

By Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems.

We’ve long considered the need for bespoke solutions and tailored systems to be a key success factor in an efficient and safe port environment. Indeed, we saw further evidence of this when we at Trelleborg won the contract to supply 86 super cone fender systems, 59 mooring bollards with a 200 tonne capacity, and 41 safety ladders for a deep sea container port that handles the largest container ships in the world.

Our solution was chosen after we worked with the port to carry out an in-depth analysis of vessel data and berthing speeds.

Our high-performance Super Cone fenders will be specifically designed for this port to accommodate berthing angles up to 10°, bow flare angles up to 15° and for the latest generation of container vessels with a displacement of 225,000 tons.

The first of the fenders for the container terminal is scheduled for delivery early this year, with the contract scheduled for completion by the end of 2013.

I’ll leave you with some words from one of our area sales managers, Andy Cope, who worked on this project: “We have future-proofed the terminal through the positioning of the fender system.  Therefore, as and when container ship sizes increase, a greater number of fenders will be engaged, absorbing greater levels of impact energy.”

“We have specified the highest quality materials in the design of the fenders, including specialist rubber compounds which have been formulated at our state-of-the-art Singapore facility.  Our in-house capabilities mean that we are able to develop bespoke, yet cost-effective solutions to meet individual project requirements.”

BREEDING A CULTURE OF LOOKING AT LONG TERM COSTS

By Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems


Encouragingly, over half of the 260 port decision makers polled in our recent Barometer Report believe that maintenance budgets will increase over the coming year.  Additionally, 90% of owners, operators and contractors cited maintenance as a critical or important factor for consideration in the upgrade of port operations. This is especially good news considering that over a quarter of respondents attributed a decrease in the levels of port-side maintenance to budget pressures.

Cause for concern?

However, the importance placed on maintenance overall does not seem to be translating to the specification of berthing, docking and mooring equipment.  The report shows that when asked specifically about procurement of such products, only 4% of respondents believe maintenance to be the most important consideration – ranking it sixth on the list of priorities. In fact, its perceived importance in the purchase of docking and mooring products has declined by 5% compared to the 2010 Barometer Report.

This suggests that there’s work to be done across the market to breed a culture of looking at long term costs.  We are increasingly seeing a lack of focus on whole life costs and when you factor in the low prioritisation of maintenance, it’s sure to store up trouble ahead for ports.

Short term savings, long term implications

Despite good intentions, it seems that short-term cost savings are taking precedence when it comes to specifying berthing, docking and mooring equipment. There is clearly a gap to bridge between understanding the importance of maintenance, and the actions taken in practice.

Berthing, docking and mooring equipment is a vital component in the safety and efficiency of the port environment, so it’s essential that specifiers give these products the significance they deserve.

Speculate to accumulate

Moreover, by sourcing high quality, low maintenance products at the outset – rather than taking retrospective action only when something goes wrong – port owners, contractors and consultants can avoid unnecessary risks and costly downtime.  Certainly a focus on maintenance at the beginning of the project will naturally lead to whole life cost savings.

If you’re interested in gaining further insights into marine industry predictions for 2012 and beyond you can download the latest Barometer Report here www.takesthepressureoff.com/barometer2

We’d of course welcome any comments or feedback on the survey outcomes and your experiences of sourcing quality berthing, docking and mooring equipment.

CAPITALISING ON INDIA’S ENGINEERING & DESIGN EXCELLENCE

By Scott Smith, Regional Director (Asia Pacific), Trelleborg Marine Systems

Indian Centre of Excellence

Trelleborg Marine Systems' newly expanded Indian Centre of Excellence

India West – an online portal for the global Indian community – this week reported that the country’s population still dominates science and engineering with Indian-born US migrants making up the vast majority of graduates in these specialisms (43.1%).

Asia has long been held up for its engineering excellence – with China coming in a close second – so it’s no surprise that global enterprises committed to keeping at the forefront of technical excellence have invested in a strong presence in the region.

Trelleborg has benefitted from a dedicated design and engineering centre in India since 2009 – a resource that is heavily relied upon by the Marine Systems division and other product areas within the Trelleborg Engineered Systems group. Indeed, the centre has become so crucial to our competitive standing as a complete ‘cradle to grave’ supplier that we’ve recently moved to new premises to centralise and expand our unique engineering and design set-up.

While we boast some level of in-house expertise at our regional offices, the more detailed engineering design, modelling and analysis aspects are now sent to the new Indian Centre of Excellence in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, for further progression. Here the business is split into two areas.  The first is engineering and design support for Trelleborg’s worldwide offices – covering Australia, Singapore, China, Japan, India, Dubai, the USA and Europe – and the second focuses on regional sales into India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

We have very high expectations for the performance of the improved engineering and design centre as a market leading offering – not least because, while our competitors choose to outsource their engineering and manufacturing requirements and thereby relinquish some degree of control, having our capabilities centralised in this way means we can maintain watertight quality right through the supply chain. Moreover, it enables us to drive cost efficiencies, improve collaboration and encourage cross fertilisation of ideas across our global offices.

If you’re a port owner, contractor or consultant interested in seeing this unique facility for yourself we’d be happy to give you the guided tour – leave a comment and we’ll get back to you.