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Tag Archives: berthing

TRELLEBORG HOSTS TECHNICAL SEMINAR FOR THE HONG KONG INSTITUTE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING COUNCIL

By Richard Hepworth, President, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation

On 25th of February, Trelleborg’s marine systems operation hosted a technical seminar for the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Training Council’s Department of Construction at our factory in Singapore.

Attended by lecturers from the largest vocational and professional education and training provider in Hong Kong, the seminar saw experts at Trelleborg discuss the latest in integrated berthing and mooring systems for ports and terminals, as well as the life cycle and design parameters of marine fenders.

Following the seminar, attendees were given a full factory tour which included the facility’s rubber lab. This provided visitors with the opportunity to see the latest developments in rubber technology first hand and the impact these technical advances have on performance and lifecycle.

It was great to see the enthusiasm of the group and we are delighted that such an esteemed educational institution is to incorporate key insights from the seminar in its training curriculum to equip civil engineering and construction students with integrated berthing and mooring systems best practice knowledge.

This is testament to Trelleborg’s unrivalled reputation and industry expertise. It was a pleasure to host the visit, and we very much look forward to the next one.

 

TRELLEBORG REPORT HIGHLIGHTS POTENTIAL OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Our latest Barometer Report, which discusses the issues impacting ports and terminals around the globe, revealed that over 40% of the port owners and operators surveyed have experienced an increase in throughput in the last twelve months.

To accommodate the higher levels of throughput, demanded by larger ships carrying more cargo, ports should look increasingly towards automated or ‘smart’ technologies.

Automated technology has a significant role to play in delivering greater operational efficiency, reducing unit costs by helping to process cargo more quickly and more consistently. This principle and drive for efficient turnaround should extend to the jetty side too. There is a vast opportunity to reduce human error and refine scheduling as vessels come in to port, berth and are dispatched.

While the wider transport and logistics sector is relatively advanced in its grasp and use of ‘smart’ technology, the ‘Internet of Things’ mentality is not necessarily translating quickly within ports and terminals. The more rapidly we take a smarter approach to connecting equipment, the quicker we can collect and analyze data from it – and the sooner we’ll improve efficiency.

With that in mind, it’s positive that 74% of those surveyed are open to new technologies, showing a willingness to adapt and improve. The industry is beginning to look forward and embrace new trends, which is reflected by the fact that so many are now using one or more forms of automated technology.

Only 7% say they don’t use any automated systems – instead, relying on human or manual guidance at their facilities. This is much less than last year, when 19% said the same, while in 2013 we observed that the market was lagging behind the technology available to it.

While the use of automated technologies continues to grow, so too does our commitment to taking a smarter approach to port and terminal efficiency, and extending the automation that is becoming increasingly well-established on the land side, to the jetty side too. This commitment was highlighted by our recent acquisition of Marimatech, whose navigation and ship positioning product line utilize the latest ‘smart’ technology. These are to be integrated with our existing product range and will further strengthen our offering as a turnkey supplier of systems for both ship and terminal owners.

To download the Barometer Report 5, visit: http://ow.ly/VmYR3

LOOKING FORWARD TO THE FLNG WORLD CONGRESS 2015!

Alistair Traylen, Chief Systems Architect, Docking and Mooring Group

At the end of June, I’ll be speaking about developments in the ship-to-ship approach and berthing systems for FLNG at the FLNG World Congress in Singapore.

My presentation will form part of Stream D at the congress, covering ‘Flexible Technology Applications for Cost-Effective FLNG Operations’, and I’ll be discussing technologies, developments and the integration of the ship-to-ship approach and berthing systems, and how they are applicable in the FLNG market.

There are a number of complexities introduced to approach and berthing in ship-to-ship operations, and further arise in the LNG arena. As the FLNG market grows, docking and mooring technology and systems integration need to evolve rapidly to keep up with it.

In particular, I’ll talk about the complexities of banked mooring in terms of berthing and position monitoring, and how they affect the relative positioning requirements for FLNG ship-to-ship berthing. I will also outline considerations for specifying and evaluating ship-to-ship berthing systems.

I’ll leave you with some words from our President, Richard Hepworth, about why this rapidly evolving industry is so important to us, and I hope to see you at the congress!

“Trelleborg is a world leader in the design and manufacture of advanced systems for LNG applications, but we know that we need to continue to innovate to remain in this position.  One of the most valuable ways for us to inform about our developments is through peer-to-peer dialogue, which is just one of the reasons why we feel events like the FLNG World Congress are so important.”

For more information on Trelleborg’s marine systems operation, visit http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems

For more information about the FLNG World Congress, visit: http://www.flngworldcongress.com/

TRELLEBORG DEMONSTRATES VALUE OF SMART SPECIFICATION

Demonstrating a commitment to quality and resisting the temptation to do business with low cost suppliers, Davao International Container Terminal, Inc. (DICT) located in Panabo City, Davao Del Norte, has purchased state-of-the-art Super Cone fenders and Tee Head bollards.

Berths 1 and 2 at the Breakbulk Terminal, which is located on the southeastern coast of the Philippines, are old concrete structures that required the installation of a superior fender system as part of upgrade works.

DICT had recently discovered that another port in Davao had upgraded their berth using low quality fender systems and they had cracked within just months of installation, with the frontal frames also beginning to corrode too. Extensive testing of the performance of the terminal’s previous fenders revealed that these were unable to guarantee the load bearing requirements of the reefer vessels currently visiting the terminal.

DICT quickly embarked on a project to replace its existing equipment with high quality, best-in-class solutions. We provided an end-to-end approach, through consultation on fendering, design along with engineering, manufacturing, testing, commissioning and installation works as well as after-sales and maintenance.

DICT turned to Trelleborg to supply 20 SCN900 fender systems to enable the berthing of vessels up to 30,000 DWT at Berths 1 and 2. As part of the terminal’s wider plans for expansion, DICT also opted for 22 SCN1100 E2.9 fender systems and 12 100T Tea Head bollards allowing for the berthing of the latest ultra-large container vessels up to 60,000 DWT at its newly constructed Berth 3.

The issue of quality in marine fenders is one that we have been discussing for some time. We have long called for more strategic specification for mission critical equipment and it’s great to see this is now translating across the market.

Like more and more customers, Davao International Container Terminal recognises the importance of quality. They realise that taking the strategic approach will mean savings over the life of the fender system and the berth as a whole, whilst reducing the risk of damage to both vessels and the terminal’s infrastructure itself.

I will leave you with a few words from Mr. Jesse G. Chiongson, Senior Vice President and General Manager of DICT, who said: “The performance of DICT’s previous fender systems significantly affected the operation of the terminal and ran the risk of harming its reputation as the leading port terminal in Mindanao. Therefore we had no hesitation in working closely with Trelleborg to define an ideal solution which would not only stand the test of time but guarantee the demanding load-bearing requirements of the vessels berthing at the terminal. Trelleborg’s unrivalled reputation and technical qualification meant the company was a natural choice to supply the project.”

BECOMING LNG LEADERS

The use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is now a widespread, commercial reality, as the demand for energy continues to rise. It’s predicted that by 2030, global energy demand will be about 35% higher than it was in 2005.

Natural gas is largely accepted to be the fastest-growing major fuel source, thanks to attributes such as it being cleaner, reliable and plentiful.  Now that it can be transported in the form of LNG, it’s become a truly viable, global resource.

In fact, the question has now become: “how can we get more LNG? Faster and cheaper?” this is clear from the proliferation of acronyms that weren’t even coined as recently as five years ago, such as, FSRUs, FLNG and LNGCs.  All of which have one thing in common, apart from the obvious LNG production and transportation element!

That is the safety factor.  LNG is simply natural gas compressed to 1/600th of the volume, but hazards of the gas in its liquid form include flammability and freezing.  It’s essential that solutions are delivered on the merits of each project, to ensure that the safety of personnel and infrastructure remains paramount.

To achieve efficient operation and maximise safety, docking and mooring solutions on the terminals or carriers that LNG is transferred between should be seamlessly integrated and developed mutually inclusively.

I think a step towards this is to bring as much of the project as possible into one holistic and aligned “package”, with one third party having oversight of a suite of products to be supplied, it’s easier to identify synergies and align the various components.

We’ve recently acquired Sea Systems Technology Ltd. (SeaTechnik) – the global market-leader in the design and manufacture of systems for safeguarding the transfer of LNG between LNG carriers and shore terminals.

In addition to developing, manufacturing and supporting systems for the safe handling of LNG, SeaTechnik has a growing share of products and solutions that monitor and can actively manage in the operating performance of ships, the aim of which is to significantly reduce both emissions and fuel costs.

Given the on-going rise in demand for LNG, we see the sector as an attractive growth area and we’re keen to be able to offer our customers a “one-stop-shop” when it comes to docking, mooring and berthing equipment for LNG projects.  This acquisition will allow us to build on our existing expertise and capabilities. SeaTechnik’s portfolio already has similar design requirements to ours and we already work together closely, so the acquisition provides natural synergies and is a logical step to take.

SeaTechnik employees 45 people globally.  Design, manufacture and assembly is based in a UK facility, outside of Chester in the North West, with local sales support, installation and commissioning work and specialist manufacturing carried out in Korea and Singapore.

I look forward to working closely with our new colleagues and would like to take the opportunity to personally welcome them to the team.

To learn more about SeaTechnik, visit the website here http://www.seatechnik.com/

INCREASING PORT SAFETY HIGH ON THE AGENDA WITH NEW BOLLARD GUIDE

By Simon Wilson, Managing Director of Docking and Mooring, Trelleborg Marine Systems.


We’ve long stressed the importance of best practice, tailor-made solutions in providing specialist berthing and mooring systems.

It’s important that bespoke, integrated solutions are put in place to enable whole life cost savings and more importantly, ensure safe operations in demanding marine environments.

But, how do you specify a system that optimizes price and value for your particular solution?

Our new bollard guide, written for port operators, and contractors aims to help with just that. The new guide features all the latest comprehensive bollard data, factors to consider in the design process and specification and installation information.

The guide also underlines why different types of bollard are required for different applications and the significance of the differing performance characteristics.

Bollards are safety critical items and as such, product quality is paramount.  The importance of demanding the highest standards of certification is highlighted, with tips on what to look for in a quality documentation package.

To download your free copy of the Bollard Guide, visit http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/.

BESPOKE SOLUTIONS WIN US A NEW DEEP SEA CONTAINER PORT CONTRACT

By Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems.

We’ve long considered the need for bespoke solutions and tailored systems to be a key success factor in an efficient and safe port environment. Indeed, we saw further evidence of this when we at Trelleborg won the contract to supply 86 super cone fender systems, 59 mooring bollards with a 200 tonne capacity, and 41 safety ladders for a deep sea container port that handles the largest container ships in the world.

Our solution was chosen after we worked with the port to carry out an in-depth analysis of vessel data and berthing speeds.

Our high-performance Super Cone fenders will be specifically designed for this port to accommodate berthing angles up to 10°, bow flare angles up to 15° and for the latest generation of container vessels with a displacement of 225,000 tons.

The first of the fenders for the container terminal is scheduled for delivery early this year, with the contract scheduled for completion by the end of 2013.

I’ll leave you with some words from one of our area sales managers, Andy Cope, who worked on this project: “We have future-proofed the terminal through the positioning of the fender system.  Therefore, as and when container ship sizes increase, a greater number of fenders will be engaged, absorbing greater levels of impact energy.”

“We have specified the highest quality materials in the design of the fenders, including specialist rubber compounds which have been formulated at our state-of-the-art Singapore facility.  Our in-house capabilities mean that we are able to develop bespoke, yet cost-effective solutions to meet individual project requirements.”

BREEDING A CULTURE OF LOOKING AT LONG TERM COSTS

By Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems


Encouragingly, over half of the 260 port decision makers polled in our recent Barometer Report believe that maintenance budgets will increase over the coming year.  Additionally, 90% of owners, operators and contractors cited maintenance as a critical or important factor for consideration in the upgrade of port operations. This is especially good news considering that over a quarter of respondents attributed a decrease in the levels of port-side maintenance to budget pressures.

Cause for concern?

However, the importance placed on maintenance overall does not seem to be translating to the specification of berthing, docking and mooring equipment.  The report shows that when asked specifically about procurement of such products, only 4% of respondents believe maintenance to be the most important consideration – ranking it sixth on the list of priorities. In fact, its perceived importance in the purchase of docking and mooring products has declined by 5% compared to the 2010 Barometer Report.

This suggests that there’s work to be done across the market to breed a culture of looking at long term costs.  We are increasingly seeing a lack of focus on whole life costs and when you factor in the low prioritisation of maintenance, it’s sure to store up trouble ahead for ports.

Short term savings, long term implications

Despite good intentions, it seems that short-term cost savings are taking precedence when it comes to specifying berthing, docking and mooring equipment. There is clearly a gap to bridge between understanding the importance of maintenance, and the actions taken in practice.

Berthing, docking and mooring equipment is a vital component in the safety and efficiency of the port environment, so it’s essential that specifiers give these products the significance they deserve.

Speculate to accumulate

Moreover, by sourcing high quality, low maintenance products at the outset – rather than taking retrospective action only when something goes wrong – port owners, contractors and consultants can avoid unnecessary risks and costly downtime.  Certainly a focus on maintenance at the beginning of the project will naturally lead to whole life cost savings.

If you’re interested in gaining further insights into marine industry predictions for 2012 and beyond you can download the latest Barometer Report here www.takesthepressureoff.com/barometer2

We’d of course welcome any comments or feedback on the survey outcomes and your experiences of sourcing quality berthing, docking and mooring equipment.

BUY CHEAP, BUY TWICE: LOW COST SUPPLIER ISSUES EXTENDS FURTHER THAN PORT INFRASTRUCTURE

Guest contributor, Andy Hatton, owner of Global Anodes UK Ltd shares his story.


I have seen a fair bit of discussion raised by Trelleborg in the last few weeks about the issue of low cost suppliers and it’s a topic that really strikes a chord with me.  There are a lot of parallels I can draw between the issues that Trelleborg’s Barometer Report brought up and my experiences.

Years ago, when working for another company, we were frequently undercut on equipment by “low cost” replicas. However, when the equipment failed, ship owners or managers would still call us to put it right.

We would always go above and beyond to help a client, dispatching engineers for the cost of a flight and a hotel in the (naive) belief they would come to us for systems next time they were building new vessels.

In reality, they got so used to us running around doing our best to keep their substandard equipment running, that the next six ships in the series would be fitted out with the same cheap rubbish as before.

After about three years we had no choice but to start saying no, that we weren’t prepared to do this for nothing and if they wanted our engineers they’d have to start paying for the service.

Another drawback to our willingness to help was that in many cases the equipment we were called in to look at was of such poor design and quality it was not economically viable to attempt repair, if indeed it was repairable at all. It became a serious concern for some of our engineers, they started to feel we either looked incompetent or as if we were lying just to make a sale when all we could do was say; “Sorry… you need to rip out all the old system and replace it”.

Before this, we’d always maintained an excellent world wide service base out of profits from the spares and systems we sold. If a client called with a problem we could usually have an engineer on a plane and on his way to meet the ship within 12 hours (in one case in 45 minutes when I had to be in Turkey for a hand over that had to be concluded that day).

We’d started to lose the equipment business, and slashed our margins so much just to compete, that our service facility gradually disappeared; the profits were simply not there to maintain it.

Worst of all, we start getting calls saying things like: “We had your engineer on the other day and he didn’t know what he was doing.”  This often came as news to me, as I was in charge arranging all engineer attendances worldwide.

Further investigation revealed that the Chief Engineer or similar would ask purchasing to get him the “anodes guy”, and purchasing would either just book any Joe Bloggs who happened to live locally or go for the cheapest quote – usually resulting in unqualified people we had never even heard of going on board vessels with the Supers and Chiefs believing they were our engineers. Until it was too late.

As a final note, the worst case scenario I experienced. An “engineer” attended a vessel in Pusan; he turned out to be some guy from a domestic appliance repair shop (apparently a contact of a company we had traded with previously.) I had a very angry Superintendent screaming down the phone at me until I explained that his company had not even spoken to us about their problem or requested an engineer… never mind sent a purchase order for a service attendance. Apparently this so called “fake” engineer even had business cards with our company logo on them.

Global Anodes UK Ltd is an independent company that is owned and operated by engineers with a range of experience in marine, offshore and industrial applications.

Global Anodes offers trouble-shooting solutions to corrosion and bio-fouling problems.

 

LNG MOORING AND MONITORING SERIES

By Simon Wilson, Trelleborg Marine System’s managing director, docking and mooring

Check out our first and second instalments in a series of seven short videos, covering vessel mooring operations from our docking and mooring divisions.

With the latest LNG export terminals requiring modern mooring and monitoring equipment to ensure safe operations, the correct specification of these systems are an essential part of the overall design of marine facilities. The first and second instalments are now live on our YouTube channel.

In the first animation, we introduce the components of a typical system and examine how design can improve safety and reliability in mooring operations. The second instalment covers our field proven Smartdock Docking Aid System and how it assists successful vessel berthing.

Keep an eye out for the next five videos in the series, which will be coming to our YouTube channel over the coming weeks.