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Tag Archives: barometer

TRELLEBORG LAUNCHES ANNUAL BAROMETER REPORT

We are delighted to announce that we have launched our fifth annual Barometer Report, which calls on the views of 200 port owners, operators, consulting engineers and contractors.

This year’s report takes a look back over the last five years to see how attitudes to investment, maintenance and quality have changed over time.

In previous years, the Barometer Report has examined the issues helping and hindering port performance over a 12 month period. This year however, we decided to find out how attitudes to investment, maintenance and quality have changed over the last five years.

During this time, ports have had to batten down the hatches in the grips of the recession, and have largely made the most of the situation they were faced with. However, as this year’s report highlights, the mist is beginning to lift, with last year’s anticipated budget boost now materializing. So much so, the majority of port owners and operators have the opportunity to invest more strategically in smart technologies and supplier service in a bid to improve long-term product performance.

One cause for concern though, is that while levels of unscheduled downtime have decreased over time, unscheduled downtime caused by fender damage has increased significantly in the last 12 months. As such, port owners, operators, consultants and contractors need to ensure they are not replacing like-for-like out of habit – but investing in quality solutions that will perform well over a long design life.

As discussed within the latest Barometer Report, supplier expertise should guide procurement decisions, and technology should enable owners and operators to minimize maintenance requirements.

To download the Barometer Report 5, visit: http://ow.ly/TA6uR

LATEST BAROMETER SURVEY CALLS FOR MARINE INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

We’ve recently launched our latest Barometer Report survey, to gather views and opinions from across the industry on a range of issues from investment, to maintenance, to performance and downtime.

So if you’re a port owner, operator, contractor or consultant, we want to hear about your experiences.  By taking ten minutes to complete the survey,  you’ll enter a free draw to win an iPad.

Last year’s report revealed an anticipated boost in investment for facilities around the world, as well as an opportunity for ports to get ahead by investing strategically in smart technologies and supplier service, with a focus on improving long term product performance.

The findings from last years’ report also pointed to the need for more supplier involvement across the whole supply chain. This year, we’re keen to see if suppliers are closing the gap between the maintenance requirements of port owners and operators, and the support that they are able to provide.

And with increasing and varied demands on facilities, such as the anticipated rise in LNG bunkering and ever-growing vessel sizes, we’re particularly keen to see if infrastructure is keeping pace and if facilities have the support they need to evolve accordingly.

To take part in the survey and enter the prize draw to win an iPad, visit: http://ow.ly/NscWd

PORTS CLAIM PIANC CERTIFICATION KEY TO COMPLIANCE AND REGULATION

The results of our latest Barometer Report show that the majority (65%) of port owners, operators and contractors request and check PIANC certification to ensure that marine fenders are sold as described.

Although it’s reassuring to see that the majority of respondents do request certification, it’s important that owners and operators understand exactly what to look for. PIANC is undoubtedly an important standard bearer for quality and performance, but it doesn’t have the legal mandate to enforce standards across the industry.

At present, it’s too easy to gain PIANC certification, with some of the more unscrupulous traders using this to their advantage by applying certification to entire product lines or factories, rather than to specific product batches and compound formulations.

In comparison to last year’s report, which revealed that just under 80% of respondents were struggling to get to grips with unscheduled downtime, this year’s Barometer reveals that, alarmingly, over 90% are now suffering, which suggests to me that the emphasis placed on checking certification in theory, is not necessarily translating to best practice.

It’s therefore imperative that equipment specifiers, for mission critical equipment such as fenders, begin to take necessary steps to ensure that the products they are buying are truly “as described”.

I’d like to get your thoughts on the matter. How much importance do you put by third party certification and design approvals when procuring mission critical equipment? Let us know in the comments section.

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Home/

PORTS STRUGGLING TO TACKLE UNSCHEDULED DOWNTIME – AND AT WHAT COST?

The results of our latest Barometer Report show that unscheduled downtime is on the rise. In comparison to last year’s report, which revealed that just under 80% of respondents were struggling to get to grips with the issue, this year’s Barometer reveals that, alarmingly, over 90% are now suffering.

The majority of respondents in this year’s report estimated that unscheduled downtime costs their facility at least £100,000 per year. We suspect that this sum may be just the tip of the iceberg – the relationship between unscheduled downtime and revenue extends further than just the direct costs of the terminal or berth not being in operation.  The less tangible cost to ports in damaged relationships with shipping lines and other stakeholders should not be underestimated.

The fact that traffic flows and vessel sizes coming through ports are steadily increasing makes it essential that ports look to update their infrastructure in order to keep pace with change. However, many may be struggling to upgrade their facilities quickly enough, which can exacerbate the issue of unscheduled downtime. Inadequate infrastructure means more incidents, more downtime and lost revenue.

This begs the question: why are so many failing to address the issue? I’d like to get your thoughts in the Comments Section.

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Home/

DON’T MAKE DO, MAKE CERTAIN!

The results of our latest Barometer Report show that many of the port owners, operators and contractors surveyed may be jeopardising operations by ‘making do’ rather than proactively upgrading facilities to maximise efficiencies and improve safety.

Although the vast majority of respondents believed that port safety would benefit from the use of new technologies (mooring line tension monitoring, environmental monitoring and speed of approach monitoring), it’s clear few are actually reaping the rewards, with over half of those surveyed admitting to only using human or manual guidance.

Automated solutions offer a chance to improve safety and boost operational efficiencies – a significant opportunity for ports to proactively upgrade infrastructure and ensure they stay ahead of the curve.

However, with so many only using human or manual guidance during berthing – rather than making use of Docking Aid Systems (DAS) or Global Positioning Systems (GPS), many may be putting their facilities at risk of becoming antiquated. This begs the question: why are so many jeopardising their operations by ‘making do’ rather than maximising efficiencies and improving safety?

The full results of Trelleborg’s latest Barometer Report, which details a wide range of findings from the industry survey, is available now as a free download from: http://www.trelleborg.com/en/Marine-Systems/Resources/Downloads-2/Barometer-Report-3-NEW/

INCREASING BUDGETS PAVE THE WAY FOR A MORE EFFICIENT 2012

By Richard Hepworth, Managing Director, Trelleborg Marine Systems

Richard Hepworth Video - Barometer Report 2

The results of our recent Barometer report indicate an encouraging increase in the capital and operational expenditure of ports over the next 12 months. It’s believed that this will mostly go into improving efficiency and increasing the capacity of port terminals – good news for port operators, contractors, consultants and suppliers alike (not least for ourselves).

Where this investment will be allocated and how best efficiencies can be achieved is the immediate issue but looking further down the line, the industry needs to become much more focused on whole life costs rather than short term savings. Because beyond the budget sheet a far more worrying outcome is emerging as a commoditised marketplace makes way for lower cost, lesser quality suppliers.

Indeed, 2012 may be looking brighter as spend is on the ‘up’ but let’s not put a downer on the forecast by forging partnerships with lower-cost suppliers and traders that are actively misusing PIANC accreditation. Port downtime and efficiencies go hand-in-hand with product quality and if the latter suffers so does the industry as a whole.

Hear my views on what sits at the heart of the biggest issues currently facing port decision makers and join our movement for better regulation and enforcement of product standards @MarineInsights on Twitter.

TESTING TIMES: DON'T COUNT THE COST OF SUPPLIER SHORTCUTS

By Mishra Kumar, Global Technical & Market Support Manager, Trelleborg Marine Systems

Mishra Kumar Trelleborg

As with all industries, some manufacturers follow acceptable practices, others don’t, so it probably comes as little surprise that online canadian pharmacy – despite the existence of PIANC fender design guidelines – the robust testing of rubber and steel is not routinely performed by all suppliers. While the short term cost savings may seem attractive, the longer term prospects of working with lesser quality products and materials presents a more problematic picture. Controlled testing in a laboratory environment is crucial to delivering consistent quality, higher performance and reliable cost effective solutions.

Here I outline our approach to ongoing research and development and call on the industry to collaboratively take a stance against outdated fender design guidelines.

HOW CAN THE INDUSTRY COUNTERACT UNSCHEDULED DOWNTIME?

By Scott Smith, Regional Director (Asia Pacific), Trelleborg Marine Systems

Scott Smith

One of the biggest issues in the market is keeping on top of downtime and maintenance – eight out of 10 ports suffer from unscheduled disruptions with almost half of these being ‘down’ for up to 10 per cent of the time. This was brought to our attention through a recent survey we conducted alongside Lloyds’ List with almost 400 port decision makers.

It revealed that budgets continue to be under pressure and maintenance appears to be suffering because of it. But it’s not all doom and gloom. Things are looking up as new technologies are being harnessed to help overcome issues with port safety and maintenance.

You can download our survey report in full from http://www.takesthepressureoff.com/barometer2 but if you’re short on time my colleagues and I have put together a series of short videos so you can digest the key findings in more bite-size chunks. Visit the Marine Insights YouTube channel or follow this link to watch at your leisure.

LAUNCH OF 2011 BAROMETER REPORT

By Richard Hepworth, managing director of Trelleborg Marine Systems

After the success of our first Barometer Report, and the debate it sparked, I am pleased to say that the second edition of the Trelleborg Marine Systems’ Barometer Report, in association with Lloyd’s List, is now available.

This year’s report has thrown out some motivating topics for industry discussion going forward and some interesting comparisons can be drawn between the results this year and last.

The 2011 report features the same topic areas as last year, with some new ground covered.  We have included a focus on industry guidelines, the role of PIANC, compliance and materials testing this year, and the results make for some interesting reading.  We have concentrated on product design, production and installation standards, whilst examining the levels of aftercare offered by manufacturers and trading companies.

Some good news from this year’s report: compared to last year, twice as many respondents are anticipating an increase in capital expenditure (up 25% on 2010).  This trend will stimulate a supply chain that is already thriving and on the whole, will benefit the market.

We need to work to convince specifiers that their increased purchasing power should be used to buy into quality products.  It is understandable that customers are looking for low cost procurement, however, we want to raise awareness of the need to consider wholelife costs when buying new products.

Although upfront costs might be lower, the products offered by low cost, non-manufacturing suppliers will not be tailored to the needs of the port, may not meet PIANC standards, and, due to the lack of technical and manufacturing capability, will not offer a high standard of maintenance and aftercare – all these factors combine to raise the cost of the product over its lifetime, and ultimately, cost the port facility more.

We still have work to do, but are confident that by working with PIANC and wider industry, we can ensure that the quality of manufacturers’ products will prevail in the market, making ports and harbours safer and ultimately, reducing the cost to the customers we supply.

Topic discussions:

What are your views on the growth of non-manufacturing companies supplying berthing and docking products?

Should PIANC take a stronger stance on the enforcement of their guidelines?

What would you like to see done to improve industry standards whilst PIANC’s 2002 guidelines are updated?